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Pausanias, Description of Greece 310 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 62 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 26 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Elis (Greece) or search for Elis (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 1, chapter 13 (search)
though forbidden, to bury Polynices, as being naturally just: For neither to-day nor yesterday, but from all eternity, these statutes live and no man knoweth whence they came. And as Empedocles says in regard to not killing that which has life, for this is not right for some and wrong for others, But a universal precept, which extends without a break throughout the wide-ruling sky and the boundless earth. AlcidamasOf Elis, pupil of Gorgias. The oration is not extant, but the scholiast supplies his words: e)leuqe/rous a)fh=ke pa/ntas qeo/s: ou)de/na dou=lon h( fu/sis pepoi/hken (“God has left all men free; Nature has made none a slave”). The Messenians had revolted from Sparta. also speaks of this precept in his Messeniacus. . . . And in relation to persons, there is a twofold division of law; for what one ought to do or ought not to do is concernedwith the community generall
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 3, chapter 14 (search)
other. For Socrates says truly in his Funeral Oration that “it is easy to praise Athenians in the presence of Athenians, but not in the presence of Lacedaemonians.”See 1.9.30. Deliberative oratory borrows its exordia from forensic, but naturally they are very uncommon in it. For in fact the hearers are acquainted with the subject, so that the case needs no exordium, except for the orator's own sake, or on account of his adversaries, or if the hearers attach too much or too little importance to the question according to his idea. Wherefore he must either excite or remove prejudice, and magnify or minimize the importance of the subject. Such are the reasons for exordia; or else they merely serve the purpose of ornament, since their absence makes the speech appear offhand. For such is the encomium on the Eleans, in which Gorgias, without any preliminary sparring or movements, starts off at once, “Elis, happy city.