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Pausanias, Description of Greece 384 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 24 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 14 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 8 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Olympia (Greece) or search for Olympia (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 2, chapter 23 (search)
r territory, were in the habit of alleging that it was festival time, when there should be a holy truce. This obviously left the door open to fraud, so Agesipolis (one of the Spartan kings) consulted the oracle of Zeus at Olympia to ask whether he was to respect such a truce. The reply of the oracle was that he might decline a truce fraudulently demanded. To confirm this, Agesipolis put the same question to Apollo: “Is your opinion as to the truce the s answered Apollo. Agesipolis thereupon invaded Argos. The point is that really Apollo had little choice, since it would have been disgraceful for the son to contradict the father. after having first consulted the oracle at Olympia, asked the god at Delphi whether his opinion was the same as his father's, meaning that it would be disgraceful to contradict him. Helen was a virtuous woman, wrote Isocrates, because Theseus so judged; the same applies to Alexand<