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Strabo, Geography 20 0 Browse Search
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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
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Plato, Euthydemus, Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno 6 0 Browse Search
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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Thurii or search for Thurii in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 3, chapter 9 (search)
The style must be either continuous and united by connecting particles, like the dithyrambic preludes, or periodic, like the antistrophes of the ancient poets. The continuous style is the ancient one; for example, “This is the exposition of the investigation of Herodotus of Thurii.” It was formerly used by all, but now is used only by a few. By a continuous style I mean that which has no end in itself and only stops when the sense is complete. It is unpleasant, because it is endless, for all wish to have the end in sight. That explains why runners, just when they have reached the goal,kampth=res, properly the turning-point of the di/aulos or double course, is here used for the goal itself. lose their breath and strength, whereas before, when the end is in sight, they show no signs of fatigue. Such is the continuous style. The other style consists of periods, and by period I mean a sentence that has a beginning and