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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 80 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 50 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 8 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1860., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Australia (Australia) or search for Australia (Australia) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 3, chapter 11 (search)
f a kind. Proverbs also are metaphors from species to species. If a man, for instance, introduces into his house something from which he expects to benefit, but afterwards finds himself injured instead, it is as the CarpathianOr, “he says it is a case of the Carpathian and the hare.” An inhabitant of the island of Carpathus introduced a brace of hares, which so multiplied that they devoured all the crops and ruined the farmers (like the rabbits in Australia). says of the hare; for both haveexperienced the same misfortunes. This is nearly all that can be said of the sources of smart sayings and the reasons which make them so. Approved hyperboles are also metaphors. For instance, one may say of a man whose eye is all black and blue, “you would have thought he was a basket of mulberries,” because the black eye is something purple, but the great quantity constitutes the hyperbole. Again, when one says “lik