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Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 12 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 8 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Macedon (Greece) or search for Macedon (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 2, chapter 23 (search)
eaking, one may always regard as identical the results produced by one or other of any two things: “You are about to decide, not about Isocrates alone, but about education generally, whether it is right to study philosophy.”Isoc. 15.173. And, “to give earth and water is slavery,” and “to be included in the common peaceThe peace concluded between the Greeks (although the Lacedaemonians held aloof) and Alexander the Great after the death of Philip of Macedon (336 B.C.). implies obeying orders.” Of two alternatives, you should take that which is useful. Another topic is derived from the fact that the same men do not always choose the same thing before and after, but the contrary. The following enthymeme is an example: “If, when in exile, we fought to return to our country [it would be monstrous] if, now that we have returned, we were to return to exile to avoid fighting”!Lys. 34.11. This amounts