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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 2 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 2 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Carpathus (Greece) or search for Carpathus (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 3, chapter 11 (search)
Like Philammon punching the leather sack. All such expressions are similes, and similes, as has been often said, are metaphors of a kind. Proverbs also are metaphors from species to species. If a man, for instance, introduces into his house something from which he expects to benefit, but afterwards finds himself injured instead, it is as the CarpathianOr, “he says it is a case of the Carpathian and the hare.” An inhabitant of the island of Carpathus introduced a brace of hares, which so multiplied that they devoured all the crops and ruined the farmers (like the rabbits in Australia). says of the hare; for both haveexperienced the same misfortunes. This is nearly all that can be said of the sources of smart sayings and the reasons which make them so. Approved hyperboles are also metaphors. For instance, one may say of a man whose eye is all black and blue, “you would have thought he was a basket