hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 74 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 48 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 44 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 18 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 16 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 16 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 16 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Mercator, or The Merchant (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10. You can also browse the collection for Rhodes (Greece) or search for Rhodes (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Demosthenes, On the Peace, section 25 (search)
we are permitting CardiaCardia, largely inhabited by Athenian colonists, was included in the peace of 346 as an ally of Philip. to be excepted from the rest of the Chersonese, the CarianIdrieus, satrap of Caria, brother and successor of the famous Mausolus, who had helped the islands in their revolt from Athens in the Social War of 357—355. to occupy the islands of Chios, Cos, and Rhodes, and the Byzantines to detain our shipsCorn—ships from the Euxine forced to pay toll at Byzantium. in harbor, obviously because we think that the respite which the peace affords is more productive of advantages than wrangling and coming to blows over these points. Therefore it is sheer folly and perversity, after dealing with the powers one by one on matters of vital concern
Demosthenes, Philippic 3, section 71 (search)
Then having completed all these preparations and made our purpose clear, we must lose no time in calling upon the other Greeks, and we must inform them by sending ambassadors [in every direction, to the Peloponnese, to Rhodes, to Chios, to the Great King—for even his interests are not unaffected if we prevent Philip from subduing the whole country—] so that if you win them over, you may have someone to share your dangers and your expenses when the time comes, or if not, that you may at least delay the course of even