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Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 22 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 18 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Diodorus Siculus, Library. You can also browse the collection for Mycenae (Greece) or search for Mycenae (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Contents of the Eleventh Book of Diodorus (search)
t of the Acragantini, was defeated by the Syracusans and lost his overlordship (chap. 53). —How Themistocles, who had fled for safety to Xerxes and was put on trial for his life, was set at liberty (chaps. 54-59). —How the Athenians freed the Greek cities throughout Asia (chaps. 60-62). —On the earthquake that occurred in Laconia (chap. 63). —On the revolt of the Messenians and Helots against the Lacedaemonians (chaps. 63-64). —How the Argives razed Mycenae to the ground and made the city desolate (chap. 65). —How the Syracusans overthrew the royal line of Gelon (chaps. 67-68). —How Xerxes was slain by treachery and Artaxerxes became king (chap. 69). —On the revolt of the Egyptians against the Persians (chap. 71). —On the civil discords which took place among the Syracusans (chaps. 72-73). —How the Athenians defeated in war the Aeginetans and Corinthians (chaps. 78-79). —How the Phocians made
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 65 (search)
no orders from the Argives; and they kept disputing with them also over the shrine of HeraThe famous Heraeum, situated at about the same distance from Mycenae and Argos in the hills south of the former. In it was later a celebrated statue of Hera, of gold and ivory, by Polycleitus. and claiming that they had In a word, the Argives were suspicious of the Mycenaeans, fearing lest, if they got any stronger, they might, on the strength of the ancient prestige of Mycenae, dispute the right of Argos to the leadership. Such, then, were the reasons for the bad blood between them; and from of old the Argives had ever be taken by storm through lack of support from outside. The Argives sold the Mycenaeans into slavery, dedicated a tenth part of them to the god, and razed Mycenae. So this city, which in ancient times had enjoyed such felicity, possessing great men and having to its credit memorable achievements, met with such an end,