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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 62 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 20 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 16 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 8 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, Odyssey. You can also browse the collection for Pytho (Greece) or search for Pytho (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Homer, Odyssey, Book 8, line 46 (search)
nst a tall pillar, and he hung the clear-toned lyre from a peg close above his head, and showed him how to reach it with his hands. And beside him he placed a basket and a beautiful table,and a cup of wine, to drink when his heart should bid him. So they put forth their hands to the good cheer lying ready before them. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, the Muse moved the minstrel to sing of the glorious deeds of warriors, from that lay the fame whereof had then reached broad heaven,even the quarrel of Odysseus and Achilles, son of Peleus, how once they strove with furious words at a rich feast of the gods, and Agamemnon, king of men, was glad at heart that the best of the Achaeans were quarrelling; for thus Phoebus Apollo, in giving his response, had told him that it should be,in sacred Pytho, when he passed over the threshold of stone to enquire of the oracle. For then the beginning of woe was rolling upon Trojans and Danaans through the will of great Zeus.
Homer, Odyssey, Book 11, line 567 (search)
ed huge Orion driving together over the field of asphodel wild beasts which he himself had slain on the lonely hills,and in his hands he held a club all of bronze, ever unbroken. “And I saw Tityos, son of glorious Gaea, lying on the ground. Over nine roods1 he stretched, and two vultures sat, one on either side, and tore his liver, plunging their beaks into his bowels, nor could he beat them off with his hands.For he had offered violence to Leto, the glorious wife of Zeus, as she went toward Pytho through Panopeus with its lovely lawns. “Aye, and I saw Tantalus in violent torment, standing in a pool, and the water came nigh unto his chin. He seemed as one athirst, but could not take and drink;for as often as that old man stooped down, eager to drink, so often would the water be swallowed up and vanish away, and at his feet the black earth would appear, for some god made all dry. And trees, high and leafy, let stream their fruits above his head, pears, and pomegranates, and apple trees