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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 32 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 26 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Phormio, or The Scheming Parasite (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 26 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 24 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 22 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria, or The Casket (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Phormio (ed. Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A.) 16 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, Odyssey. You can also browse the collection for Lemnos (Greece) or search for Lemnos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Homer, Odyssey, Book 8, line 250 (search)
hung from above, from the roof-beams,fine as spiders' webs, so that no one even of the blessed gods could see them, so exceeding craftily were they fashioned. But when he had spread all his snare about the couch, he made as though he would go to Lemnos, that well-built citadel, which is in his eyes far the dearest of all lands.And no blind watch did Ares of the golden rein keep, when he saw Hephaestus, famed for his handicraft, departing, but he went his way to the house of famous Hephaestus, ehandicraft, departing, but he went his way to the house of famous Hephaestus, eager for the love of Cytherea of the fair crown. Now she had but newly come from the presence of her father, the mighty son of Cronos,and had sat her down. And Ares came into the house and clasped her hand and spoke and addressed her: “Come, love, let us to bed and take our joy, couched together. For Hephaestus is no longer here in the land, but has now gone, I ween, to Lemnos, to visit the Sintians of savage speech
Homer, Odyssey, Book 8, line 295 (search)
So he spoke, and a welcome thing it seemed to her to lie with him. So they two went to the couch, and lay them down to sleep, and about them clung the cunning bonds of the wise Hephaestus, nor could they in any wise stir their limbs or raise them up. Then at length they learned that there was no more escaping.And near to them came the famous god of the two strong arms,1 having turned back before he reached the land of Lemnos; for Helius had kept watch for him and had brought him word. So he went to his house with a heavy heart, and stood at the gateway, and fierce anger seized him.And terribly he cried out and called to all the gods: “Father Zeus, and ye other blessed gods that are forever, come hither that ye may see a laughable matter and a monstrous,1 even how Aphrodite, daughter of Zeus, scorns me for that I am lame and loves destructive Aresbecause he is comely and strong of limb, whereas I was born misshapen. Yet for this is none other to blame but my two parents—would they had