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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 6 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 6 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Bacchae (ed. T. A. Buckley) 4 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 2 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Shield of Heracles 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White). You can also browse the collection for Pieria (Greece) or search for Pieria (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Hymn 4 to Hermes (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 62 (search)
rickery in his heart —deeds such as knavish folk pursue in the dark night-time; for he longed to taste flesh. The Sun was going down beneath the earth towards Ocean with his horses and chariot when Hermes came hurrying to the shadowy mountains of Pieria, where the divine cattle of the blessed gods had their steads and grazed the pleasant, unmown meadows. Of these the Son of Maia, the sharp-eyed slayer of Argus then cut off from the herd fifty loud-lowing kine, and drove them straggling-wise acro, unimagined; for he mixed together tamarisk and myrtle-twigs, fastening together an armful of their fresh, young wood, and tied them, leaves and all securely under his feet as light sandals. That brushwood the glorious Slayer of Argus plucked in Pieria as he was preparing for his journey, making shiftSuch seems to be the meaning indicated by the context, though the verb is taken by Allen and Sikes to mean, “to be like oneself,” and so “to be original.” as one making haste for a long journey.
Hymn 4 to Hermes (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 174 (search)
poke together, the son of Zeus who holds the aegis, and the lady Maia. Now Eos the early born, bringing light to men, was rising from deep-flowing Ocean, when Apollo, as he went, came to Onchestus, the lovely grove and sacred place of the loud-roaring Holder of the Earth. There he found an old man grazing his beast along the pathway from his court-yard fence, and the all-glorious Son of Leto began and said to him. “Old man, weederLit. “thorn-plucker.” of grassy Onchestus, I am come here from Pieria seeking cattle, cows all of them, all with curving horns, from my herd. The black bull was grazing alone away from the rest, but fierce-eyed hounds followed the cows, four of them, all of one mind, like men. These were left behind, the dogs and the bull —which is a great marvel; but the cows strayed out of the soft meadow, away from the pasture when the sun was just going down. Now tell me this, old man born long ago: have you seen one passing along behind those cows?” Then the old man an