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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 156 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 56 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 30 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 26 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 14 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 14 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 14 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 10 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White). You can also browse the collection for Arcadia (Greece) or search for Arcadia (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Hymn 4 to Hermes (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 1 (search)
Muse, sing of Hermes, the son of Zeus and Maia, lord of Cyllene and Arcadia rich in flocks, the luck-bringing messenger of the immortals whom Maia bare, the rich-tressed nymph, when she was joined in love with Zeus, —a shy goddess, for she avoided the company of the blessed gods, and lived within a deep, shady cave. There the son of Cronos used to lie with the rich-tressed nymph, unseen by deathless gods and mortal men, at dead of night while sweet sleep should hold white-armed Hera fast. And when the purpose of great Zeus was fulfilled, and the tenth moon with her was fixed in heaven, she was delivered and a notable thing was come to pass. For then she bare a son, of many shifts, blandly cunning, a robber, a cattle driver, a bringer of dreams, a watcher by night, a thief at the gates, one who was soon to show forth wonderful deeds among the deathless gods. Born with the dawning, at mid-day he played on the lyre, and in the evening he stole the cattle of far-shooting Apollo on the fo
Hymn 18 to Hermes (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 1 (search)
I sing of Cyllenian Hermes, the Slayer of Argus, lord of Cyllene and Arcadia rich in flocks, luck-bringing messenger of the deathless gods. He was born of Maia, the daughter of Atlas, when she had mated with Zeus, — a shy goddess she. Ever she avoided the throng of the blessed gods and lived in a shadowy cave, and there the Son of Cronos used to lie with the rich-tressed nymph at dead of night, while white-armed Hera lay bound in sweet sleep: and neither deathless god nor mortal man knew it. And so hail to you, Son of Zeus and Maia; with you I have begun: now I will turn to another song! Hail, Hermes, giver of grace, guide, and giver of good thing
Hymn 19 to Pan (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 1 (search)
t the mountain-top, and the god on this side or on that of the choirs, or at times sidling into the midst, plies it nimbly with his feet. On his back he wears a spotted lynx-pelt, and he delights in high-pitched songs in a soft meadow where crocuses and sweet-smelling hyacinths bloom at random in the grass. They sing of the blessed gods and high Olympus and choose to tell of such an one as luck-bringing Hermes above the rest, how he is the swift messenger of all the gods, and how he came to Arcadia, the land of many springs and mother of flocks, there where his sacred place is as god of Cyllene. For there, though a god, he used to tend curly-fleeced sheep in the service of a mortal man, because there fell on him and waxed strong melting desire to wed the rich-tressed daughter of Dryops, and there he brought about the merry marriage. And in the house she bare Hermes a dear son who from his birth was marvellous to look upon, with goat's feet and two horns —a noisy, merry-laughing child.