hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 62 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 12 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Ion (ed. Robert Potter) 6 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White). You can also browse the collection for Parnassus (Greece) or search for Parnassus (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Hymn 3 to Apollo (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 267 (search)
But if you will be moved by me —for you, lord, are stronger and mightier than I, and your strength is very great —build at Crisa below the glades of Parnassus: there no bright chariot will clash, and there will be no noise of swift-footed horses near your well-built altar. But so the glorious tribes of men will bring gifts to you as Iepaeon (‘Hail-Healer’), and you will receive with delight rich sacrifices from the people dwelling round about.” So said Telphusa, that she alone, and not the Far- Apollo, until you came to the town of the presumptuous Phlegyae who dwell on this earth in a lovely glade near the Cephisian lake, caring not for Zeus. And thence you went speeding swiftly to the mountain ridge, and came to Crisa beneath snowy Parnassus, a foothill turned towards the west: a cliff hangs over it from above, and a hollow, rugged glade runs under. There the lord Phoebus Apollo resolved to make his lovely temple, and thus he said: “In this place I am minded to build a glo
Hymn 3 to Apollo (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 349 (search)
lear flowing water: here my renown shall also be and not yours alone?” Thus spoke the lord, far-working Apollo, and pushed over upon her a crag with a shower of rocks, hiding her streams: and he made himself an altar in a wooded grove very near the clear-flowing stream. In that place all men pray to the great one by the name Telphusian, because he humbled the stream of holy Telphusa. Then Phoebus Apollo pondered in his heart what men he should bring in to be his ministers in sacrifice and to serve him in rocky Pytho. And while he considered this, he became aware of a swift ship upon the wine-like sea in which were many men and goodly, Cretans from Cnossos,Inscriptions show that there was a temple of Apollo Delphinius (cp. ll. 495-6) at Cnossus and a Cretan month bearing the same name. the city of Minos, they who do sacrifice to the prince and announce his decrees, whatsoever Phoebus Apollo, bearer of the golden blade, speaks in answer from his laurel tree below the dells of Parnassus
Hymn 3 to Apollo (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 493 (search)
dwell on Olympus. And when they had put away craving for drink and food, they started out with the lord Apollo, the son of Zeus, to lead them, holding a lyre in his hands, and playing sweetly as he stepped high and featly. So the Cretans followed him to Pytho, marching in time as they chanted the Ie Paean after the manner of the Cretan paean-singers and of those in whose hearts the heavenly Muse has put sweet-voiced song. With tireless feet they approached the ridge and straightway came to Parnassus and the lovely place where they were to dwell honored by many men. There Apollo brought them and showed them his most holy sanctuary and rich temple. But their spirit was stirred in their dear breasts, and the master of the Cretans asked him, saying: “Lord, since you have brought us here far from our dear ones and our fatherland, —for so it seemed good to your heart,—tell us now how we shall live. That we would know of you. This land is not to be desired either for vineyards or for pasture<
Hymn 4 to Hermes (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 550 (search)
There are certain holy ones, sisters born —three virginsThe Thriae, who practised divination by means of pebbles (also calledqriai/). In this hymn they are represented as aged maidens (ll. 553-4), but are closely associated with bees (ll. 559-563) and possibly are here conceived as having human heads and breasts with the bodies and wings of bees. See the edition of Allen and Sikes, Appendix III. gifted with wings: their heads are besprinkled with white meal, and they dwell under a ridge of Parnassus. These are teachers of divination apart from me, the art which I practised while yet a boy following herds, though my father paid no heed to it. From their home they fly now here, now there, feeding on honey-comb and bringing all things to pass. And when they are inspired through eating yellow honey, they are willing to speak truth; but if they be deprived of the gods' sweet food, then they speak falsely, as they swarm in and out together. These, then, I give you; enquire of them st