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Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin). You can also browse the collection for Cyclades (Greece) or search for Cyclades (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 36 (search)
for to the latter they left the home country—sufficient for their needs—and for the former they provided more land than they had owned since they embraced in their conquests all the territory which we Hellenes now possess.For the traditional “Ionic migration,” led by Athens, in the course of which settlements were made in Samos and Chios and in the islands of the Cyclades, in Asia Minor, and on the shores of the Black Sea, see Isoc. 12.43-44, 166, 190; Thuc. 1.2.6; Grote, History of Greece (new edition), ii. pp. 21 ff. And so they smoothed the way for those also who in a later time resolved to send out colonists and imitate our city; for these did not have to undergo the perils of war in acquiring territory, but could go into the country marked out by us and se
Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 132 (search)
And yet it is the duty of men who are proud because of natural gifts and not merely because of fortune to undertake such deeds much rather than to levy tributeFor tribute levied by Sparta see Xen. Hell. 6.2.16. on the islanders,The Cyclades, hilly and comparatively barren. who are deserving of their pity, seeing that because of the scarcity of land they are compelled to till mountains, while the people of the mainland,The “mainlanders”—Persian subjects in Asia Minor. because of the abundance of their territory, allow most of it to lie waste, and have, nevertheless, from that part of it which they do harvest, grown immensely
Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 136 (search)
But these things we take no thought to prevent; instead, we wrangle about the islands of the Cyclades, when we have so recklessly given over so many cities and such great forces to the barbarians. And therefore some of our possessions are now his, some will soon be his, and others are threatened by his treacherous designs. And he has rightly conceived an utter contempt for us all;
Isocrates, Panathenaicus (ed. George Norlin), section 43 (search)
First they took the islands of the Cyclades,In the campaigns of the so-called “Ionian Migration.” See Isoc. 4.34 ff. about which there had been much contention during the overlordship of Minos of Crete and which finally were occupied by the Carians,See Hdt. 1.171. and, having driven out the latter, refrained from appropriating the lands of these islands for themselves, but instead settled upon them those of the Hellenes who were most lacking in means of subsisten