hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 32 32 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 7 7 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 2 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 2 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 2 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 1 1 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 41-50 1 1 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for 403 BC or search for 403 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 29 (search)
shall omit. Then there is a small temple, into which every year on fixed days they carry the image of Dionysus Eleuthereus. Such are their sanctuaries here, and of the graves the first is that of Thrasybulus son of Lycus, in all respects the greatest of all famous Athenians, whether they lived before him or after him. The greater number of his achievements I shall pass by, but the following facts will suffice to bear out my assertion. He put down what is known as the tyranny of the Thirty403 B.C., setting out from Thebes with a force amounting at first to sixty men; he also persuaded the Athenians, who were torn by factions, to be reconciled, and to abide by their compact. His is the first grave, and after it come those of Pericles, ChabriasDied 357 B.C. and Phormio.A famous Athenian admiral who fought well in the early part of the Peloponnesian War. There is also a monument for all the Athenians whose fate it has been to fall in battle, whether at sea or on land, except such of th
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Boeotia, chapter 11 (search)
l stands to Icarus on a promontory jutting out into the Aegean. After this Icarus are named both the island and the sea around it. The carvings on the gables at Thebes are by Praxiteles, and include most of what are called the twelve labours. The slaughter of the Stymphalian birds and the cleansing of the land of Elis by Heracles are omitted; in their place is represented the wrestling with Antaeus. Thrasybulus, son of Lycus, and the Athenians who with him put down the tyranny of the Thirty,403 B.C set out from Thebes when they returned to Athens, and therefore they dedicated in the sanctuary of Heracles colossal figures of Athena and Heracles, carved by Alcamenes in relief out of Pentelic marble. Adjoining the sanctuary of Heracles are a gymnasium and a race-course, both being named after the god. Beyond the Chastiser stone is an altar of Apollo surnamed God of Ashes; it is made out of the ashes of the victims. The customary mode of divination here is from voices, which is used by th