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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 194 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Robert Browning) 50 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 48 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 34 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 32 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Hecuba (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 20 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 18 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Ilium (Turkey) or search for Ilium (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 35 (search)
t Telamon sat when he gazed at the ship in which his children were sailing away to Aulis to take part in the joint expedition of the Greeks. Those who dwell about Salamis say that it was when Ajax died that the flower first appeared in their country. It is white and tinged with red, both flower and leaves being smaller than those of the lily; there are letters on it like to those on the iris. About the judgment concerning the armour I heard a story of the Aeolians who afterwards settled at Ilium, to the effect that when Odysseus suffered shipwreck the armour was cast ashore near the grave of Ajax. As to the hero's size, a Mysian was my informant. He said that the sea flooded the side of the grave facing the beach and made it easy a enter the tomb, and he bade me form an estimate of the size of the corpse in the following way. The bones on his knees, called by doctors the knee-pan, were in the case of Ajax as big as the quoit of a boy in the pentathlon. I saw nothing to wonder at i
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 17 (search)
ea, and the land beneath the Heraeum after Prosymna. This Asterion flows above the Heraeum, and falling into a cleft disappears. On its banks grows a plant, which also is called asterion. They offer the plant itself to Hera, and from its leaves weave her garlands. It is said that the architect of the temple was Eupolemus, an Argive. The sculptures carved above the pillars refer either to the birth of Zeus and the battle between the gods and the giants, or to the Trojan war and the capture of Ilium. Before the entrance stand statues of women who have been priestesses to Hera and of various heroes, including Orestes. They say that Orestes is the one with the inscription, that it represents the Emperor Augustus. In the fore-temple are on the one side ancient statues of the Graces, and on the right a couch of Hera and a votive offering, the shield which Menelaus once took from Euphorbus at Troy. The statue of Hera is seated on a throne; it is huge, made of gold and ivory, and is a work of
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 32 (search)
ytus, and, having cut it, she brings it to the temple and dedicates it. They will not have it that he was dragged to death by his horses, and, though they know his grave, they do not show it. But they believe that what is called the Charioteer in the sky is the Hippolytus of the legend, such being the honor he enjoys from the gods. Within this enclosure is a temple of Apollo Seafaring, an offering of Diomedes for having weathered the storm that came upon the Greeks as they were returning from Troy. They say that Diomedes was also the first to hold the Pythian games in honor of Apollo. Of Damia and Auxesia (for the Troezenians, too, share in their worship) they do not give the same account as the Epidaurians and Aeginetans, but say that they were maidens who came from Crete. A general insurrection having arisen in the city, these too, they say, were stoned to death by the opposite party; and they hold a festival in their honor that they call Stoning. In the other part of the enclosure i
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Laconia, chapter 22 (search)
it that when Orestes sat down upon it his madness left him. For this reason the stone was named in the Dorian tongue Zeus Cappotas. Before Gythium lies the island Cranae, and HomerHom. Il. 3.445 says that when Alexander had carried off Helen he had intercourse with her there for the first time. On the mainland opposite the island is a sanctuary of Aphrodite Migonitis (Union), and the whole place is called Migonium. This sanctuary, they say, was made by Alexander. But when Menelaus had taken Ilium and had returned safe home eight years after the sack of Troy, he set up near the sanctuary of Migonitis an image of Thetis and the goddesses Praxidicae (Exacters of Justice). Above Migonium is a mountain called Larysiumi sacred to Dionysus, and at the beginning of spring they hold a festival in honor of Dionysus, and among the things they say about the ritual is that they find here a ripe bunch of grapes. Some thirty stades beyond Gythium on the left there are on the mainland walls of a pl