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Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 4 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Acharnians (ed. Anonymous) 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas R. Martin, An Overview of Classical Greek History from Mycenae to Alexander 2 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Ion (ed. Robert Potter) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Cyclades (Greece) or search for Cyclades (Greece) in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 21 (search)
rname of Rhantes—it is a sort of national characteristic for Alexandrians to have a surname. This man was the first Egyptian to be convicted by the Eleans of a misdemeanor. It was not for giving or taking a bribe that he was condemned, but for the following outrageous conduct in connection with the games. He did not arrive by the prescribed time, and the Eleans, if they followed their rule, had no option but to exclude him from the games. For his excuse, that he had been kept back among the Cyclades islands by contrary winds, was proved to be an untruth by Heracleides, himself an Alexandrian by birth. He showed that Apollonius was late because he had been picking up some money at the Ionian games. In these circumstances the Eleans shut out from the games Apollonius with any other boxer who came after the prescribed time, and let the crown go to Heracleides without a contest. Whereupon Apollonius put on his gloves for a fight, rushed at Heracleides, and began to pummel him, though he ha
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 23 (search)
ird the Corinthians, fourth the Sicyonians, fifth the Aeginetans; after the Aeginetans, the Megarians and Epidaurians, of the Arcadians the people of Tegea and Orchomenus, after them the dwellers in Phlius, Troezen and Hermion, the Tirynthians from the Argolid, the Plataeans alone of the Boeotians, the Argives of Mycenae, the islanders of Ceos and Melos, Ambraciots of the Thesprotian mainland, the Tenians and the Lepreans, who were the only people from Triphylia, but from the Aegean and the Cyclades there came not only the Tenians but also the Naxians and Cythnians, Styrians too from Euboea, after them Eleans, Potidaeans, Anactorians, and lastly the Chalcidians on the Euripus. Of these cities the following are at the present day uninhabited: Mycenae and Tiryns were destroyed by the Argives after the Persian wars. The Ambraciots and Anactorians, colonists of Corinth, were taken away by the Roman emperorAugustus to help to found Nicopolis near Actium. The Potidaeans twice suffered remo