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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 60 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 56 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 34 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 16 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 12 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 10 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 10 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 6 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). You can also browse the collection for Eleusis (Greece) or search for Eleusis (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 9 For Epharmostus of Opus Wrestling-Match 466 B. C. (search)
d the contest for silver cups among the older men! Having subdued those men by the trick of quickly shifting balance without falling, with what a roar of applause did he pass through the ring, in his prime, and handsome, and having accomplished the finest deeds. Again, among the Parrhasian people he was marvellous to look at, at the festival of Lycaean Zeus, and when at Pellana he carried off as his prize a warm remedy against chilly winds. The tomb of Iolaus bears witness for him, and also Eleusis by the sea, for his splendid achievements.That which is inborn is always the best; but many men strive to win glory with excellence that comes from training. Anything in which a god has no part is none the worse for being quelled in silence. For some roads lead farther than others, and a single occupation will not nourish us all. The paths to skill are steep; but, while offering this prize of song, boldly shout aloudthat this man, by the blessing of the gods, was born with deftness of hand
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 13 For Xenophon of Corinth Foot Race and Pentathlon 464 B. C. (search)
noble herald, who announced their victories sixty times at both places, will confirm my words. Their victories at Olympia seem to have already been mentioned; and of those in the future I could tell clearly when the time comes. For now I am hopeful, although a god controlsthe outcome. If the good fortune of their family continues, we shall leave this to Zeus and Enyalius to accomplish. They won six times beneath the brow of Parnassus; and all their victories in Argos and in Thebes, and all that shall be witnessed by the royal Lycaean altar that rules over the Arcadians, and by Pellana, and Sicyon, and Megara, the beautifully enclosed precinct of the Aeacidae,and Eleusis and splendid Marathon, and the wealthy and beautiful cities beneath the high crest of Aetna, and Euboea—you may search through all Greece, and you will find that their victories are more than the eye can see. Come, swim away with agile feet!Zeus the Accomplisher, grant reverence, and a sweet good fortune of delights
Pindar, Isthmean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Isthmian 1 For Herodotus of Thebes Chariot Race ?458 B. C. (search)
he man whom the sea nourishes. Every man is intent upon keeping persistent famine from his belly.But he who wins rich renown in the games or in war receives the highest gain: to be well spoken of by his fellow-citizens and by strangers, the choicest bloom of speech. For us it is right to celebrate the earth-shaking son of Cronus, returning a good deed to our beneficent neighbor, the lord of horse-racing and chariots;and to invoke your sons, Amphitryon, and the secluded valley of Minyas, and Eleusis, the famous precinct of Demeter, and Euboea, when we speak of curving race-courses. Protesilas, I add besides your sacred ground in Phylace, the home of Achaean men.But the brief limits of my song prevent me from telling of all the victories that Hermes, lord of games, granted to Herodotus and his horses. Truly, often that which is hushed in silence actually brings greater pleasure. May he, raised up on the splendid wings of the Pierian Muses with their lovely voices,also arm his hand with