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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 464 0 Browse Search
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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 174 0 Browse Search
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Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 106 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 74 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 64 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). You can also browse the collection for Greece (Greece) or search for Greece (Greece) in all documents.

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Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 6 For Hagesias of Syracuse Mule Car Race 472 or 468 B. C. (search)
omes all.” They came to the steep rock of the lofty hill of Cronus.There the god gave him a double treasure of prophecy: there and then to hear a voice that did not know how to lie; and when bold-plotting Heracles came, the sacred scion of the Alcidae, and founded for his father a festival frequented by mortals and the greatest ritual of contests,then he commanded him to establish an oracle on the highest altar of Zeus. Since then the race of the sons of Iamus has been very famous throughout Greece. Prosperity attended them; and by honoring excellence, they walk along a bright path. Every action brings evidence. Envious blame from others hangsover those who have once driven first down the final course of a race, and on whom honored Grace has shed glorious beauty. But if, Hagesias, it is true that the men on your mother's side, living below the boundaries of Cyllene, piously gave many gifts, with prayers and sacrifices, to the herald of the gods, Hermes, who rules over games and the dis
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 13 For Xenophon of Corinth Foot Race and Pentathlon 464 B. C. (search)
e noble herald, who announced their victories sixty times at both places, will confirm my words. Their victories at Olympia seem to have already been mentioned; and of those in the future I could tell clearly when the time comes. For now I am hopeful, although a god controlsthe outcome. If the good fortune of their family continues, we shall leave this to Zeus and Enyalius to accomplish. They won six times beneath the brow of Parnassus; and all their victories in Argos and in Thebes, and all that shall be witnessed by the royal Lycaean altar that rules over the Arcadians, and by Pellana, and Sicyon, and Megara, the beautifully enclosed precinct of the Aeacidae,and Eleusis and splendid Marathon, and the wealthy and beautiful cities beneath the high crest of Aetna, and Euboea—you may search through all Greece, and you will find that their victories are more than the eye can see. Come, swim away with agile feet!Zeus the Accomplisher, grant reverence, and a sweet good fortune of delights
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 1 For Hieron of Aetna Chariot Race 470 B. C. (search)
he man who is himself the leader,and who instructs his son, may bring honor to the people and turn them towards harmonious peace. I entreat you, son of Cronus, grant that the battle-shouts of the Carthaginians and Etruscans stay quietly at home, now that they have seen their arrogance bring lamentation to their ships off Cumae. Such were their sufferings, when they were conquered by the leader of the Syracusans—a fate which flung their young men from their swift ships into the sea,delivering Hellas from grievous bondage. From Salamis I will win as my reward the gratitude of the Athenians, and in Sparta from the battles before CithaeronReading with Snell ta=n . . maka=n for ta\n . . ma/kan; read either a)/ra (Wilamowitz) or a)po\ (Stone, CR 49, 1935, 124) for e)re/w. Cf. R. W. B. Burton, Pindar's Pythian Odes, Oxford 1962, 106f.—those battles in which the Medes with their curved bows suffered sorely; but beside the well-watered bank of the river Himeras I shall win my reward by paying m
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 2 For Hieron of Syracuse Chariot Race ?470 or 468 (search)
ve unaging glory. For my part, I must avoid the aggressive bite of slander. For I have seen, long before me,abusive Archilochus often in a helpless state, fattening himself with strong words and hatred. But to be rich by the grace of fortune is the best part of skillful wisdom. And you clearly have this blessing, and can display it with a generous mind, ruler and leader of many garland-crowned streets and a great army. When wealth and influence are in question,anyone who says that any man in Greece of earlier times surpassed you has a soft mind that flails around in vain. But I shall ascend a ship covered with flowers, and sing the praises of excellence. Boldness helps youth in terrible wars; and so I say that you too have found boundless fame by fighting among both horsemen and foot soldiers. And your wisdom beyond your years provides me with praise of you that cannot be challenged in any detail. Greetings! This song, like Phoenician merchandise, is sent to you over the gray sea: look
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 4 For Arcesilas of Cyrene Chariot Race 462 B. C. (search)
of the demigods put an end to them. And then the Argonauts came to Phasis, where they clashed with the dark-faced Colchians in the realm of Aeetes himself. And the queen of sharpest arrows brought the dappled wryneck from Olympus, bound to the four spokesof the indissoluble wheel: Aphrodite of Cyprus brought the maddening bird to men for the first time, and she taught the son of Aeson skill in prayerful incantations, so that he could rob Medea of reverence for her parents, and a longing for Greece would lash her, her mind on fire, with the whip of Persuasion.And she quickly revealed the means of performing the labors set by her father; and she mixed drugs with olive oil as a remedy for hard pains, and gave it to him to anoint himself. They agreed to be united with each other in sweet wedlock. But when Aeetes placed in their midst the adamantine ploughand the oxen, who breathed the flame of burning fire from their golden jaws and stamped at the earth in turn with their bronze hoofs, he
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 7 For Megacles of Athens Four-Horse Chariot Race 486 B. C. (search)
Pythian 7 For Megacles of Athens Four-Horse Chariot Race 486 B. C. The great city of Athens is the most beautiful prelude of song, which the widely powerful race of the Alcmaeonids can lay as a foundation of odes in honor of their horses.What fatherland, what family will you name that is more illustrious in Greece? For in all cities the storyof the citizens of Erechtheus makes the rounds, Apollo, how they made your dwelling in divine Pytho a marvel to see. Five Isthmian victories lead my song forward, and one outstanding triumphat Zeus' Olympian games, and two from Cirrha— yours, Megacles, and your ancestors'. I rejoice at this new success; but I grieve that fine deeds are repaid with envy.It is true what they say: the abiding bloom of good fortune brings with it both good and bad.
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 10 For Hippocleas of Thessaly Boys« Double Foot Race 498 B. C. (search)
oth grow sweet when a god urges on a man«s work. No doubt he accomplished this with the help of your counsels. Kinship has stepped into the footprints of the father, who was twice an Olympic victor in the war-enduring armor of Ares;and the contest in the deep meadow that stretches beneath the rock of Cirrha made Phricias victorious in the race. May a good fate follow them in their future days as well, so that their noble wealth will blossom; having received no small share of the delights of Greece, may they encounter no envious reversals at the hands of the gods. A god«s heart should be free from pain; but a man is considered fortunate, and wise poets sing his praises, if he wins victory with his hands or the excellence of his feet, and takes the greatest prizes through his courage and strength, and lives to see his young son duly winning Pythian garlands. He can never set foot in the bronze heavens; but whatever splendor we mortals can attain, he reaches the limit of that voyage. Ne
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 12 For Midas of Acragas Flute-Playing Contest 490 B. C. (search)
Pythian 12 For Midas of Acragas Flute-Playing Contest 490 B. C. I beseech you, splendor-loving city, most beautiful on earth, home of Persephone; you who inhabit the hill of well-built dwellings above the banks of sheep-pasturing Acragas: be propitious, and with the goodwill of gods and men, mistress,receive this victory garland from Pytho in honor of renowned Midas, and receive the victor himself, champion of Hellas in that art which once Pallas Athena discovered when she wove into music the dire dirge of the reckless Gorgons which Perseus heardpouring in slow anguish from beneath the horrible snakey hair of the maidens, when he did away with the third sister and brought death to sea-girt Seriphus and its people. Yes, he brought darkness on the monstrous race of Phorcus, and he repaid Polydectes with a deadly wedding-present for the longslavery of his mother and her forced bridal bed; he stripped off the head of beautiful Medusa, Perseus, the son of Danae, who they say was conceive
Pindar, Nemean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Nemean 6 For Alcimidas of Aegina Boys' Wrestling ?465 B. C. (search)
t man, an Olympic victor, was the first to bring garlands from the Alpheus to the Aeacidae; and he had himself crowned five times at the Isthmus,and three times at Nemea, putting an end to the obscurity of Socleides, who proved to be the greatest of the sons of Hagesimachus, since he had three victorious sons who reached the summit of excellence,and who had a taste of toils. With the favorable fortune of the gods, no other family has been proclaimed by the boxing contest in the center of all Greece as the guardian of more garlands. I hope, with this great praise, to hit the target squarely, like one who shoots from a bow. Come, Muse, give a straight course to the glorious wind of song for this man.For when men pass away songs and stories preserve their fine deeds for them, and there is no shortage of these in the house of the Bassids. Their race has long been famous, carrying a cargo of their own victory songs; for those who plough the field of the Pierian Muses, they are able to provi
Pindar, Nemean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Nemean 10 For Theaeus of Argos Wrestling ?444 B. C. (search)
ry of all the noble things in which the precinct of Argos has a share.And there is also the satiety of men, which is grievous to encounter. But nevertheless, awaken the well-strung lyre, and take thought of wrestling; the contest for the bronze shield calls the people to the sacrifice of oxen in honor of Hera and to the trial of contests. There the son of Ulias, Theaeus, was victorious twice, and gained forgetfulness of toils that were bravely borne. And he once was victor over the people of Greece at Pytho; and, going with good fortune, he won the crown at the Isthmus and at Nemea, and he gave the Muses a field to plough, since he won three times at the gates of the sea, and three times on the sacred ground, according to the ordinance of Adrastus. Father Zeus, his mouth keeps silent what his heart truly desires. The accomplishment of alldeeds rests with you. Adding boldness to a heart that does not shrink from laborOmit comma after ou)d', taking it with a)mo/kqw rather than with the v
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