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Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 168 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Theogony 48 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 38 0 Browse Search
Homer, Iliad 36 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 26 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 22 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 18 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). You can also browse the collection for Olympus (Greece) or search for Olympus (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 10 document sections:

Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 1 For Hieron of Syracuse Single Horse Race 476 B. C. (search)
same service for Zeus. But when you disappeared, and people did not bring you back to your mother, for all their searching, right away some envious neighbor whispered that they cut you limb from limb with a knife into the water's rolling boil over the fire,and among the tables at the last course they divided and ate your flesh. For me it is impossible to call one of the blessed gods a glutton. I stand back from it. Often the lot of evil-speakers is profitlessness. If indeed the watchers of Olympus ever honored a mortal man,that man was Tantalus. But he was not able to digest his great prosperity, and for his greed he gained overpowering ruin, which the Father hung over him: a mighty stone. Always longing to cast it away from his head, he wanders far from the joy of festivity. He has this helpless life of never-ending labor,a fourth toil after three others, because he stole from the gods nectar and ambrosia, with which they had made him immortal, and gave them to his drinking companio
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 2 For Theron of Acragas Chariot Race 476 B. C. (search)
st trophy of battle;and Theron must be proclaimed because of his victorious four-horse chariot, Theron who is just in his regard for guests, and is the bulwark of Acragas, the strength of the city, the choicest bloom of illustrious ancestors, who labored much with their spirits, and won a sacred home by the river, and werethe eye of Sicily; their allotted lifetime attended them, bringing wealth and grace to their inborn excellence. But you, son of Cronus and Rhea, who rule over your home on Olympus, and over the foremost of festivals, and over the ford of Alpheus, be warmed by our songs and graciously preserve their ancestral land for their future generations. When deeds have been accomplished, whether justly or contrary to justice, not even Time the father of all things could undo the outcome. But forgetfulness may come, with favorable fortune. Under the power of noble joys, malignant painis subdued and dies, whenever god-sent Fate lifts prosperity on high. This saying applies to the
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 3 For Theron of Acragas Chariot Race 476 B. C. (search)
a├┐getehad inscribed as a sacred dedication to Artemis who sets things right. Pursuing that doe he had also seen that land beyond the cold blasts of Boreas; there he had stood and marvelled at the trees, and sweet desire for them possessed him, to plant them around the boundary-line of the horse-racing ground with its twelve courses. And now in his kindness he comes regularly to this festival of ours, together with the godliketwin sons of deep-waisted Leda. For Heracles, when he ascended to Olympus, assigned to them the ordering of the marvellous contest of men, the contest in excellence and in the driving of swift chariots. And so my spirit somehow urges me to say that glory has come to the Emmenidae and to Theron through the dispensation of the sons of Tyndareus with their fine horses, because that familycomes to them with the most hospitable feasting-tables of any mortal men, observing the rites of the blessed gods with pious thoughts. If water is best and gold is the most honored
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 9 For Epharmostus of Opus Wrestling-Match 466 B. C. (search)
l and MSS oi)=mon for ou)=ron. of song; praise wine that is old, but praise the flowers of songs that are new. They tell, indeed,how the strength of the waters overwhelmed the dark earth; but by the skills of Zeus the ebbing tide suddenly drained off the flood. From these were descended your ancestors with their bronze shields,young men sprung from the beginning from the stock of the daughters of Iapetus and from the powerful sons of Cronus, always a native line of kings, until the ruler of Olympus carried off the daughter of Opus from the land of the Epeians, and lay with her peacefully in the glens of Mount Maenalus, and brought herto Locrus, so that age would not overtake him and lay the burden of childlessness on him. His bride was carrying in her womb the seed of the greatest god, and the hero rejoiced to see his adopted son, and gave him the same name as his mother's father, Opus,a man beyond words in beauty and fine deeds. Locrus gave him a city and a people to govern, and stra
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 13 For Xenophon of Corinth Foot Race and Pentathlon 464 B. C. (search)
rmed bridle around its jaws and caught the winged horse. Mounted on its back and armored in bronze, at once he began to play with weapons. And with Pegasus, from the chilly bosom of the lonely air,Reading with Snell and MSS yuxrw=n and e)rh/mou for yuxra=s and e)rhh/mwn. he once attacked the Amazons, the female army of archers,and he killed the fire-breathing Chimaera, and the Solymi. I shall pass over his death in silence; but Pegasus has found his shelter in the ancient stables of Zeus in Olympus. But I, while casting the whirling javelins with straight aim, must not miss the markas I speed many shafts with the strength of my hands. I have come as a willing champion of the Muses on their splendid thrones and of the race of Oligaethus. I shall make their many victories at the Isthmus and at Nemea manifest in a few words; and, as a truthful witness under oath,the sweet-tongued cry of the noble herald, who announced their victories sixty times at both places, will confirm my words. The
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 4 For Arcesilas of Cyrene Chariot Race 462 B. C. (search)
rushed into deep danger, they entreated the lord of ships that they might escape the irresistible onset of the clashing rocks. There was a pair of them; they were alive, and they rolled onward more swiftlythan the battle-lines of the loud-thundering winds. But that voyage of the demigods put an end to them. And then the Argonauts came to Phasis, where they clashed with the dark-faced Colchians in the realm of Aeetes himself. And the queen of sharpest arrows brought the dappled wryneck from Olympus, bound to the four spokesof the indissoluble wheel: Aphrodite of Cyprus brought the maddening bird to men for the first time, and she taught the son of Aeson skill in prayerful incantations, so that he could rob Medea of reverence for her parents, and a longing for Greece would lash her, her mind on fire, with the whip of Persuasion.And she quickly revealed the means of performing the labors set by her father; and she mixed drugs with olive oil as a remedy for hard pains, and gave it to him
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 11 For Thrasydaeus of Thebes Foot Race or Double Foot Race 474 or 454 B. C. (search)
ctorious long ago; they captured the swift radiance of the famous games at Olympia with their horses. And at Pytho, when they entered the naked footrace, they put to shamethe Hellenic host with their speed. May I desire fine things from the gods, seeking what is possible at my time of life. For I have found that those of middle rank in a city flourish with longer prosperity, and I find fault with the lot of tyrannies. I am intent upon common excellences. The evil workings of envy are warded off,if a man who attains the summit and dwells in peace escapes dread arrogance. Such a man would go to the farthest shore of a dark death that is finer when he leaves to his sweetest offspring the grace of a good name, the best of possessions. Such is the grace that spreads abroad the fame of the son of Iphicles,Iolaus, whose praises are sung; and of the strength of Castor, and of you, lord Polydeuces, sons of the gods: you who dwell for one day at home in Therapne, and for the other in Olympus.
Pindar, Nemean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Nemean 1 For Chromius of Aetna Chariot Race ?476 B. C. (search)
se, bed of Artemis, sister of Delos! From you sweet-voicedsong rushes out to give great praise for storm-footed horses, by the grace of Aetnaean Zeus. The chariot of Chromius and Nemea urge me to harness a song of praise for deeds of victory. The foundations of the song have been laid with the gods, and with this man's god-given excellence.The summit of perfect glory is found in good fortune. The Muse loves to remember great contests. Sow some splendor on the island, which Zeus the lord of Olympus gave to Persephone; he nodded assent with his flowing hair, that as the best land on the fruitful earth< he would make Sicily fertile and prosperous in her cities blossoming with wealth. And the son of Cronus sent her a people enamored of bronze-armored battle, horsemen often wedded to the golden leaves of Olympia's olive. I have embarked on the occasion for many themes, without flinging a false word. I have arrived singing of fine deeds at the courtyard gatesof a man who loves guests, wh
Pindar, Nemean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Nemean 10 For Theaeus of Argos Wrestling ?444 B. C. (search)
in bronze armor,he slew the Teleboae. Taking on the appearance of Amphitryon, the king of the immortals entered the hall of that hero, bearing the fearless seed of Heracles; whose bride Hebe, the most beautiful of the goddesses, walks forever in Olympus beside her mother Hera, goddess of marriage. My mouth is too small to tell the whole story of all the noble things in which the precinct of Argos has a share.And there is also the satiety of men, which is grievous to encounter. But nevertheless,my son. But Castor was begotten after your conception by the hero, your mother's husband, who came to her and sowed his mortal seed. But nevertheless I grant you your choice in this. If you wish to escape death and hated old age, and to dwell in Olympus yourself with me and with Athena and Ares of the dark spear, you can have this lot. But if you strive to save your brother, and intend to share everything equally with him, then you may breathe for half the time below the earth, and for half the
Pindar, Isthmean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Isthmian 4 For Melissus of Thebes Pancratium ?474/3 (search)
lls the swoop of the eagle by falling on her back. And it is right to do anything to blot out one's enemy. For Melissus was not allotted the nature of Orion;he is negligible to look at, though heavy to grapple with in his strength. And yet once there went from Thebes, Cadmus' city, a hero short in stature but unflinching in spirit. This hero went to the house of Antaeus in grain-bearing Libya, to keep him from roofing Poseidon's temple with the skulls of strangers, Alcmena's son. He went to Olympus, after he had explored all lands and the high-cliffed hollow of the gray sea, and had tamed the straits for sailors. Now he dwells beside aegis-bearing Zeus, and has the most beautiful prosperity. He is honored as a friend by the immortals and is married to Hebe;he is lord of a golden house, and son-in-law to Hera. For him, above the Electran gates, we Thebans, busily preparing the feast and the circle of newly-built altars, pile up burnt offerings in honor of the eight bronze-clad men, now