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Pausanias, Description of Greece 256 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 160 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 80 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 74 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 70 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 64 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 54 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Suppliants (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 54 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 36 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Laws. You can also browse the collection for Argos (Greece) or search for Argos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 8 document sections:

Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 683c (search)
in making this second attempt to investigate legislation, we shall listen to a discourse that is no worse and no shorter than that we have just been listening to, I for one would go a long way to hear it; indeed, this would seem quite a short day, although it is, as a matter of fact, close on midsummer.AthenianSo it seems that we must proceed with our enquiry.MegillusMost certainly.AthenianLet us, then, place ourselves in imagination at that epoch when Lacedaemon, together with Argos and Messene and the adjoining districts, had become completely subject,
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 683d (search)
Megillus, to your forefathers. They determined next, according to the tradition, to divide their host into three parts, and to establish three States,—Argos, Messene and Lacedaemon.MegillusVery true.AthenianAnd Temenus became King of Argos, Cresphontes of Messene, and Proclus and Eurysthenes of Lacedaemon.MegillusOf course.AthenianAnd all the men of that time swore that they would assist these kings Megillus, to your forefathers. They determined next, according to the tradition, to divide their host into three parts, and to establish three States,—Argos, Messene and Lacedaemon.MegillusVery true.AthenianAnd Temenus became King of Argos, Cresphontes of Messene, and Proclus and Eurysthenes of Lacedaemon.MegillusOf course.AthenianAnd all the men of that time swore that they would assist these ki
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 685a (search)
MegillusWhat do you mean? What fault have you to find with it?AthenianThis, that whereas there were three States settled, two of the threeviz., Argos and Messene,—the third being Laconia. speedily wrecked their constitution and their laws, and one only remained stable—and that was your State, Megillus.MegillusThe question is no easy one.AthenianYet surely in our consideration and enquiry into this subject, indulging in an old man's sober play with laws, we ought to proceed on our jour
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 685d (search)
formed a grave charge against the Greeks. It was in view of all this that the Dorian host was at that time organizes and distributed amongst three States under brother princes, the sons of Heraclesviz., Temenus, king of Argos, Procles and Eurystheus of Laconia, Cresphontes of Messene.; and men thought it admirably devised, and in its equipment superior even to the host that had sailed to Troy. For men reckoned, first, that in the sons of Heracles they had better chiefs than the Pelopidae,viz., Agamemnon and Menelaus. and further,
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 690d (search)
Athenian“Seest thou, O legislator,”—it is thus we might playfully address one of those who lightly start on the task of legislation— “how many are the rights pertaining to rulers, and how they are essentially opposed to one another? Herein we have now discovered a source of factions, which thou must remedy. So do thou, in the first place, join with us in enquiring how it came to pass, and owing to what transgression of those rights, that the kings of Argos and Messene brought ruin alike on themselves and on the Hellen
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 692d (search)
AthenianThe way they repulsed the Persians, Clinias, was disgraceful. But when I say “disgraceful,” I do not imply that they did not win fine victories both by land and sea in those victorious campaigns: what I call “disgraceful” is this,—that, in the first place, one only of those three States defended Greece, while the other two were so basely corrupt that one of themMessene actually prevented Lacedaemon from assisting Greece by warring against her with all its might, and Argos, the other,—which stood first of the three in the days of the Dorian
Plato, Laws, Book 4, section 707e (search)
CliniasThe best by far.AthenianIn the next place tell me this: who are the people that are to be settled? Will they comprise all that wish to go from any part of Crete, supposing that there has grown up in every city a surplus population too great for the country's food supply? For you are not; I presume, collecting all who wish to go from Greece; although I do, indeed, see in your country settlers from Argos, Aegina,
Plato, Laws, Book 4, section 708a (search)
and other parts of Greece. So tell us now from what quarters the present expedition of citizens is likely to be drawn.CliniasIt will probably be from the whole of Crete and of the rest of the Greeks, they seem most ready to admit people from the Peloponnese as fellow-settlers. For it is quite true, as you said just now, that we have some here from Argos, amongst them being the most famous of our clans, the Gortynian, which is a colony from Gortys, in the Peloponnese.