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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 464 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 290 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 244 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 174 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 134 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 106 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 74 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 64 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 62 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 58 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Alcibiades 1, Alcibiades 2, Hipparchus, Lovers, Theages, Charmides, Laches, Lysis. You can also browse the collection for Greece (Greece) or search for Greece (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Plato, Alcibiades 1, section 104a (search)
Let me explain the reason of your spirit being too much for them. You say you have no need of any man in any matter; for your resources are so great, beginning with the body and ending with the soul, that you lack nothing. You think, in the first place, that you are foremost in beauty and stature—and you are not mistaken in this, as is plain for all to see—and in the second place, that you are of the most gallant family in your city, the greatest city in Greece,
Plato, Alcibiades 1, section 104b (search)
that there you have, through your father, very many of the best people as your friends and kinsmen, who would assist you in case of need, and other connections also, through your mother, who are not a whit inferior to these, nor fewer. And you reckon upon a stronger power than all those that I have mentioned, in Pericles, son of Xanthippus, whom your father left as guardian of you and your brother when he died, and who is able to do whatever he likes not only in this city but all over Greece and among many great nations of the barbarians.
Plato, Alcibiades 1, section 122e (search)
nor of all the flocks and herds that graze in Messene. However, I pass over all these things: but there is more gold and silver privately held in Lacedaemon than in the whole of Greece; for during many generations treasure has been passing in to them from every part of Greece, and often from the barbarians also, but not passing out to anyone; and just as in the fable of Aesop, nor of all the flocks and herds that graze in Messene. However, I pass over all these things: but there is more gold and silver privately held in Lacedaemon than in the whole of Greece; for during many generations treasure has been passing in to them from every part of Greece, and often from the barbarians also, but not passing out to anyone; and just as in the fable of Aesop,
Plato, Alcibiades 2, section 148e (search)
took counsel together and decided that the best thing they could do was to send and inquire of AmmonAn Ethiopian god whose cult spread over Egypt, and through Cyrene to various parts of Greece: he had temples at Thebes and Sparta, but the famous one in the Libyan desert is probably meant here.; and moreover, to ask also for what reason the gods granted victory to the Spartans rather than to themselves: “for we”—such was the message— “offer up to them more and finer sacrifices than any of the Greeks, and have adorned their temples with votive emblems as no other people have done, and presented to the gods the costliest and stateliest processions year by year, and spent more money
Plato, Lovers, section 135c (search)
or six minae,A mina(=100 drachmae)would be about 6-8 pounds in our money today. but a first-rate architect cannot be got for even ten thousand drachmae; few such, indeed, could be found throughout the whole of Greece. Is it something of this sort that you mean? When he heard me say this, he admitted that something like this was what he himself meant.I next asked him if it was not impossible for the same person to learn in this way merely two of the arts, not to speak of many or the principal ones; to which he replied: Do not conceive me, Socrates,