hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 60 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 20 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 18 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 14 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 12 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Theogony 4 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Alcibiades 1, Alcibiades 2, Hipparchus, Lovers, Theages, Charmides, Laches, Lysis 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War. You can also browse the collection for Nemea (Greece) or search for Nemea (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 3, chapter 96 (search)
After bivouacking with the army in the precinct of Nemean Zeus, in which the poet Hesiod is said to have been killed by the people of the country, according to an oracle which had foretold that he should die in Nemea, Demosthenes set out at daybreak to invade Aetolia. The first day he took Potidania, the next Krokyle, and the third Tichium, where he halted and sent back the booty to Eupalium in Locris, having determined to pursue his conquests as far as the Ophionians, and in the event of their refusing to submit, to return to Naupactus and make them the objects of a second expedition. Meanwhile the Aetolians had been aware of his design from the moment of its formation,
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 5, chapter 59 (search)
Discovering this, the Argives came up from Nemea, day having now dawned. On their way they fell in with the troops of the Phliasians and Corinthians, and killed a few of the Phliasians, and had perhaps a few more of their own men killed by the Corinthians. Meanwhile the Boeotians, Megarians, and Sicyonians, advancing upon Nemea according to their instructions, found the Argives no longer there, as they had gone down on seeing their property ravedaemonians and their allies shut them off from their city; above them were the Corinthians, Phliasians, and Pellenians; and on the side of Nemea the Boeotians, Sicyonians, and Megarians. Meanwhile their army was without cavalry, the Athenians alone among the allie
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 5, chapter 60 (search)
ians and allies followed their general out of respect for the law, but amongst themselves loudly blamed Agis for going away from so fair a field (the enemy being hemmed in on every side by infantry and cavalry) without having done anything worthy of their strength. Indeed this was by far the finest Hellenic army ever yet brought together; and it should have been seen while it was still united at Nemea, with the Lacedaemonians in full force, the Arcadians, Boeotians, Corinthians, Sicyonians, Pellenians, Phliasians and Megarians, and all these the flower of their respective populations, thinking themselves a match not merely for the Argive confederacy, but for another such added to it. The army thus retired blaming Agis, and returned every man to his home.