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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 12 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War. You can also browse the collection for Aegean or search for Aegean in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 1, chapter 98 (search)
First the Athenians besieged and captured Eion on the Strymon from the Medes, and made slaves of the inhabitants, being under the command of Cimon, son of Miltiades. Next they enslaved Scyros the island in the Aegean, containing a Dolopian population, and colonized it themselves. This was followed by a war against Carystus, in which the rest of Euboea remained neutral, and which was ended by surrender on conditions. After this Naxos left the confederacy, and a war ensued, and she had to return after a siege; this was the first instance of the engagement being broken by the subjugation of an allied city, a precedent which was followed by that of the rest in the order which circumstances prescribed.
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 4, chapter 109 (search)
The same winter the Megarians took and razed to the foundations the long walls which had been occupied by the Athenians; and Brasidas after the capture of Amphipolis marched with his allies against Acte, a promontory running out from the king's dike with an inward curve, and ending in Athos, a lofty mountain looking towards the Aegean sea. In it are various towns, Sane, an Andrian colony, close to the canal, and facing the sea in the direction of Euboea; the others being Thyssus, Cleone, Acrothoi, Olophyxus, and Dium, inhabited by mixed barbarian races speaking the two languages. There is also a small Chalcidian element; but the greater number are Tyrrheno-Pelasgians once settled in Lemnos and Athens, and Bisaltians, Cre