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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 22 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 6 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs) 2 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 2 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War. You can also browse the collection for Danube or search for Danube in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 2, chapter 96 (search)
Beginning with the Odrysians, he first called out the Thracian tribes subject to him between Mounts Haemus and Rhodope and the Euxine and Hellespont; next the Getae beyond Haemus, and the other hordes settled south of the Danube in the neighborhood of the Euxine, who, like the Getae, border on the Scythians and are armed in the same manner, being all mounted archers. Besides these he summoned many of the Hill Thracian independent swordsmen, called Dii and mostly inhabiting Mount Rhodope, some of whom came as mercenaries, others as volunteers; also the Agrianes and Laeaeans, and the rest of the Paeonian tribes in his empire, at the confines of which these lay, extending up to the Laeaean Paeonian
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 2, chapter 97 (search)
The empire of the Odrysians extended along the seaboard from Abdera to the mouth of the Danube in the Euxine. The navigation of this coast by the shortest route takes a merchantman four days and four nights with a wind astern the whole way: by land an active man, travelling by the shortest road, can get from Abdera to the Danube in Danube in eleven days. Such was the length of its coast line. Inland from Byzantium to the Laeaeans and the Strymon, the farthest limit of its extension into the interior, it is a journey of thirteen days for an active man. The tribute from all the barbarian districts and the Hellenic cities, taking what they brought in under Seuthes, the successor of Sitalces,