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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 78 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 48 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 40 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 28 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 22 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Hecuba (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). You can also browse the collection for Thrace (Greece) or search for Thrace (Greece) in all documents.

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Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 5, chapter 1 (search)
l. Furthermore, they got a fifty-oared warship from the Trapezuntians, and put it under the command of Dexippus, a Laconian perioecus.The perioeci were the inhabitants of the outlying Laconian towns; they were free, but not Spartan citizens. This fellow, however, paying no heed to the duty of collecting vessels, slipped away with his man-of-war and left the Euxine. He did indeed get his deserts afterwards; for while engaged in some intrigue at the court of SeuthesSee Xen. Anab. 7.2.31-34. in Thrace he was killed by Nicander the Laconian. They also got a thirty-oared galley, and put it under the command of Polycrates the Athenian, who brought in to the camp all the merchant vessels that he captured. And they would unload the cargoes, in case the ships had any, and put them under guard, in order to keep these safe and to use the vessels themselves for transport service. While these things were going on, the Greeks were making forays in quest of booty, and while some parties would secure
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 6, chapter 2 (search)
the greatest possible amount of booty; and they disembarked at Calpe Harbour, about midway of the Thracian coast. But Cheirisophus went by land from the very beginning of his journey from the city of the Heracleots, travelling across country; when, however, he had entered Thrace, he proceeded along the coast, for the reason that he was ill. Xenophon, finally, took ships, disembarked at the boundaries separating Thrace and the territory of Heracleia, and pursued his way through the back country. the greatest possible amount of booty; and they disembarked at Calpe Harbour, about midway of the Thracian coast. But Cheirisophus went by land from the very beginning of his journey from the city of the Heracleots, travelling across country; when, however, he had entered Thrace, he proceeded along the coast, for the reason that he was ill. Xenophon, finally, took ships, disembarked at the boundaries separating Thrace and the territory of Heracleia, and pursued his way through the back country.
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 6, chapter 4 (search)
During that day they bivouacked where they were, upon the beach by the harbour. Now this place which is called Calpe Harbour is situated in Thrace-in-Asia; and this portion of Thrace begins at the mouth of the Euxine and extends as far as Heracleia, being on the right as one sails into the Euxine. It is a long day's journey for a trireme to row from Byzantium to Heracleia, and between the two places there is no other city, either friendly or Greek, only Bithynian Thracians; and they are said to abuse outrageously any Greeks they may find shipwrecked or may capture in any other way. As for Calpe Harbour, it lies midway of the voyage between Heracleia and Byzantium and is a bit of land jutting out into the sea, the part of it which extends seaward being a precipitous mass of rock, not less than twenty fathoms high at its lowest point, and the isthmus which connects this head with the mainland being about four plethra in width; and the space to the seaward of the isthmus is large enough f
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 1 (search)
they were to march by way of the Sacred MountainOn the northern coast of the Propontis. Their destination was the Gallipoli peninsula, and the alternative routes are a short but difficult one or a long, easy one. or go round through the middle of Thrace. While they were talking over these matters, the soldiers caught up their arms and rushed at full speed toward the gates, intending to get back inside the city wall. But when Eteonicus and his men saw the hoplites running towards them, they shut fering his services to any city or people that might be wanting a general; so at this time he came to the troops and said that he was ready to lead them to the Delta,i.e. since he was the only Lacedaemonian among the generals. as it is called, of Thrace, where they could get plenty of good things; and until they should reach there, he said he would supply them with food and drink in abundance. When the soldiers heard this proposal and the word that came back at the same time from Anaxibius—his r
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 2 (search)
to Perinthus,On the European shore of the Propontis. to take it across to Asia with all speed; he also gave him a thirty-oared warship and a letter, and sent with him a man who was to order the Perinthians to furnish Xenophon with horses and speed him on his way to the army as rapidly as possible. So Xenophon sailed across to Perinthus and then made his way to the army; and the soldiers received him with pleasure, and were glad to follow his lead at once, with the idea of crossing over from Thrace to Asia. Meanwhile Seuthes, upon hearing of Xenophon's arrival, sent Medosades to him again by sea, and begged him to bring the army to him, offering any promise whereby he imagined he could persuade him. Xenophon replied that it was not possible for anything of this sort to come to pass, and upon receiving this answer Medosades departed. As for the Greeks, when they reached Perinthus, Neon with about eight hundred men parted company with the others and took up a separate camp; but all the r
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 3 (search)
im speak; if not, I will put this question to vote.” And as no one spoke in opposition, he put the matter to vote, and this plan was decided upon. So he told Seuthes at once that they would take service with him. After this the troops went into camp by divisions, but the generals and captains were invited to dinner by Seuthes in a village he was occupying near by. When they had reached his doors and were about to go in to dinner, there stood a certain Heracleides, of Maroneia;A Greek city in Thrace. this fellow came up to each single one of the guests who, as he imagined, were able to make a present to Seuthes, first of all to some people of Parium who had come to arrangeThrough the mediation of Seuthes; cp. Xen. Anab. 7.2.32-4. a friendship with Medocus, the king of the Odrysians, and brought gifts with them for him and his wife; to them Heracleides said that Medocus was a twelve days' journey inland from the sea, while Seuthes, now that he had got this army, would be master upon the