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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 194 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Robert Browning) 50 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 48 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 34 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 32 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Hecuba (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 20 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 18 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.). You can also browse the collection for Ilium (Turkey) or search for Ilium (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 1, line 1 (search)
Tell me, O Muse, of that many-sided hero who traveled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit, and many were the people with whose customs and thinking [noos] he was acquainted; many things he suffered at sea while seeking to save his own life [psukhê] and to achieve the safe homecoming [nostos] of his companions; but do what he might he could not save his men, for they perished through their own sheer recklessness in eating the cattle of the Sun-god Helios; so the god prevented them from ever reaching home. Tell me, as you have told those who came before me, about all these things, O daughter of Zeus, starting from whatsoever point you choose. So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had got safely home except Odysseus, and he, though he was longing for his return [nostos] to his wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had got him into a large cave and wanted to marry him. But as years went by, there came a
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 2, line 1 (search)
d the people gathered thereon; then, when they were got together, he went to the place of assembly spear in hand - not alone, for his two hounds went with him. Athena endowed him with a presence of such divine comeliness [kharis] that all marveled at him as he went by, and when he took his place in his father's seat even the oldest councilors made way for him. Aigyptios, a man bent double with age, and of infinite experience, was the first to speak His son Antiphos had gone with Odysseus to Ilion, land of noble steeds, but the savage Cyclops had killed him when they were all shut up in the cave, and had cooked his last dinner for him. He had three sons left, of whom two still worked on their father's land, while the third, Eurynomos, was one of the suitors; nevertheless their father could not get over the loss of Antiphos, and was still weeping for him when he began his speech. "Men of Ithaca," he said, "hear my words. From the day Odysseus left us there has been no meeting of our c
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 11, line 4 (search)
"‘Mother,’ said I, ‘I was forced to come here to consult the ghost [psukhê] of the Theban seer Teiresias. I have never yet been near the Achaean land nor set foot on my native country, and I have had nothing but one long series of misfortunes from the very first day that I set out with Agamemnon for Ilion, the land of noble steeds, to fight the Trojans. But tell me, and tell me true, in what way did you die? Did you have a long illness, or did heaven grant you a gentle easy passage to eternity? Tell me also about my father, and the son whom I left behind me; is my property still in their hands, or has some one else got hold of it, who thinks that I shall not return to claim it? Tell me again what my wife intends doing, and in what mind [noos] she is; does she live with my son and guard my estate securely, or has she made the best match she could and married again?’ "My mother answered, ‘Your wife still remains in your house, but she is in great distress of mind and spends her wh
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 14, line 1 (search)
this you answered, O swineherd Eumaios, "Stranger, though a still poorer man should come here, it would not be right for me to insult him, for all strangers and beggars are from Zeus. You must take what you can get and be thankful, for servants live in fear when they have young lords for their masters; and this is my misfortune now, for heaven has hindered the return [nostos] of him who would have been always good to me and given me something of my own - a house, a piece of land, a good looking wife, and all else that a liberal master allows a servant who has worked hard for him, and whose labor the gods have prospered as they have mine in the situation which I hold. If my master had grown old here he would have done great things by me, but he is gone, and I wish that Helen's whole race were utterly destroyed, for she has been the death of many a good man. It was this matter that took my master to Ilion, the land of noble steeds, to fight the Trojans in the cause of king Agamemnon."