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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 32 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Phormio, or The Scheming Parasite (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 26 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 26 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 24 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 22 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria, or The Casket (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Phormio (ed. Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A.) 16 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.). You can also browse the collection for Lemnos (Greece) or search for Lemnos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 8, line 5 (search)
cobwebs; he also let many hang down from the great beam of the ceiling. Not even a god could see them, so fine and subtle were they. As soon as he had spread the chains all over the bed, he made as though he were setting out for the fair state of Lemnos, which of all places in the world was the one he was most fond of. But Ares kept no blind look out, and as soon as he saw him start, hurried off to his house, burning with love for Aphrodite. Now Aphrodite was just come in from a visit to her faf Lemnos, which of all places in the world was the one he was most fond of. But Ares kept no blind look out, and as soon as he saw him start, hurried off to his house, burning with love for Aphrodite. Now Aphrodite was just come in from a visit to her father Zeus, and was about sitting down when Ares came inside the house, and said as he took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Hephaistos: he is not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whose speech is barbarous."
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 8, line 6 (search)
She was not unwilling, so they went to the couch to take their rest, whereon they were caught in the toils which cunning Hephaistos had spread for them, and could neither get up nor stir hand or foot, but found too late that they were in a trap. Then Hephaistos came up to them, for he had turned back before reaching Lemnos, when his scout the sun told him what was going on. He was in a furious passion, and stood in the vestibule making a dreadful noise as he shouted to all the gods. "Father Zeus," he cried, "and all you other blessed gods who live for ever, come here and see the ridiculous and disgraceful sight that I will show you. Zeus’ daughter Aphrodite is always dishonoring me because I am lame. She is in love with Ares, who is handsome and clean built, whereas I am a cripple - but my parents are responsible [aitioi] for that, not I; they ought never to have begotten me. Come and see the pair together asleep on my bed. It makes me furious to look at them. They are very fond of o