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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White). You can also browse the collection for 1880 AD or search for 1880 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), BOOK II, CHAPTER XI (search)
Appian and Plutarch drew. The words used by Crastinus are almost identical in the three passages (one of Appian and two of Plutarch), and this leads Wynne, Hulleman, and Hermann Peter to believe that both authors borrowed from Pollio's history. Vollgraff on the other hand contends that as Pollio wrote in Latin it would have been little less than miraculous if both of them had used the same Greek words in translating it. He considers it remarkable also that the only reference made to Pollio's writings by either of them should have been here, and that both of them mentioned incidentally the fact that Pollio himself took part in the engagement. All of these coincidences may be explained if we suppose that both Plutarch and Appian took the facts from a common Greek source; that is, from some author who took them from Pollio. (See Vollgraff's Greek Writers of Roman History, Leyden, 1880.)
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), FRAGMENTA, CONCERNING REMUS AND ROMULUSThis is a transcript, with slight variations, of the first of the Excerpta "Concerning the Kings." (search)
CONCERNING REMUS AND ROMULUSThis is a transcript, with slight variations, of the first of the Excerpta "Concerning the Kings." FROM THE COLLECTION OF MAX. TREU (1880) WHEN Troy was captured on the 8th day of the month of December, Æneas fled to Mount Ida, passing through the Achæans, who gave way to him as he was carrying off his household gods and his family. Others say that it was not that pious sight that saved him, but that Æneas had often urged the barbarians to give Helen back to the Achæans. There, having collected a band of Phrygians,Mendelssohn considers the text spurious down to this point. he departed to Laurentum, and having married Lavinia, the daughter of Latinus, king of the Aborigines, he built a city and named it Lavinium after his wife. Three years later Latinus died, and Æneas succeeded to the kingdom, by virtue of his marriage relationship, and gave the name of Latins to the Ab