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Polybius, Histories 296 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 36 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 22 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 22 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 18 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 18 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 18 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 12 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White). You can also browse the collection for Carthage (Tunisia) or search for Carthage (Tunisia) in all documents.

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Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), THE CIVIL WARS, CHAPTER II (search)
eian Rock. In the tumult many of the Gracchans perished, and Gracchus himself was caughtReading a(lw/menos, which Mendelssohn prefers instead of ei)lou/menos. near the temple, and was slain at the door close by the statues of the kings. All the bodies were thrown by night into the Tiber. So perished on the Capitol, and while still tribune, Gracchus, the son of the Gracchus who was twice consul, and of Cornelia, daughter of that Scipio who subjugated Carthage. He lost his life in consequence of a most excellent design, which, however, he pursued in too violent a manner. This shocking affair, the first that was perpetrated in the public assembly, was seldom without parallels thereafter from time to time. On the subject of the murder of Gracchus the city was divided between sorrow and joy. Some mourned for themselves and for him, and deplored the present condition of things, believing that the commonwealth no
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), THE CIVIL WARS, CHAPTER III (search)
ces and settled down in other people's. Y.R. 625 The Italian allies who complained of these disturbances, B.C. 129 and especially of the lawsuits hastily brought against them, chose Cornelius Scipio, the destroyer of Carthage, to defend them against these grievances. As he had availed himself of their very valiant services in war he was reluctant to disregard their request. So he came into the Senate, and although, out of regard for the plebeians, hlity, and these men had been expressly chosen the founders of it in order to get them out of the way for a while, so that the Senate might have a respite from demagogism. They marked out a town for the colony on the place where Carthage had formerly stood, disregarding the fact that Scipio, when he destroyed it, had devoted it with curses to sheep-pasturage forever. They assigned 6000 colonists to this place, instead of the smaller number fixed by law, in orde