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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 68 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 54 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 52 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 26 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 18 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 16 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 12 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 8 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White). You can also browse the collection for Tiber (Italy) or search for Tiber (Italy) in all documents.

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Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), THE CIVIL WARS, CHAPTER II (search)
r apparatus that had been brought for the use of the assembly, began beating them, and pursued them, and drove them over the precipice.The Capitoline hill was flanked by the Tarpeian Rock. In the tumult many of the Gracchans perished, and Gracchus himself was caughtReading a(lw/menos, which Mendelssohn prefers instead of ei)lou/menos. near the temple, and was slain at the door close by the statues of the kings. All the bodies were thrown by night into the Tiber. So perished on the Capitol, and while still tribune, Gracchus, the son of the Gracchus who was twice consul, and of Cornelia, daughter of that Scipio who subjugated Carthage. He lost his life in consequence of a most excellent design, which, however, he pursued in too violent a manner. This shocking affair, the first that was perpetrated in the public assembly, was seldom without parallels thereafter from time to time. On the subject of the mu