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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 60 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 48 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 20 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Trinummus: The Three Pieces of Money (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long). You can also browse the collection for Jupiter (Canada) or search for Jupiter (Canada) in all documents.

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Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
How a man should proceed from the principle of god being the father of all men to the rest. IF a man should be able to assent to this doctrine as he ought, that we are all sprung from GodEpictetus speaks of God o( qeo/s and the gods. Also conformably to the practice of the people, he speaks of God under the name of Zeus. The gods of the people were many, but his God was perhaps one. Father of men and gods, says Homer of Zeus; and Virgil says of Jupiter, Father of gods and king of men. Salmasius proposed a)po\ tou= qeou=. See Schweig.'s note. in an especial manner, and that God is the father both of men and of gods, I suppose that he would never have any ignoble or mean thoughts about himself. But if Caesar (the emperor) should adopt you, no one could endure your arrogance; and if you know that you are the son of Zeus, will you not be elated? Yet we do not so; but since these two things are mingled in the generation of man, body in common with the animals, and reason and intelligence
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
ator of them, but an interpreter. For this reason it is shameful for man to begin and to end where irrational animals do; but rather he ought to begin where they begin, and to end where nature ends in us; and nature ends in contemplation and understanding, and in a way of life conformable to nature. Take care then not to die without having been spectators of these things. But you take a journey to Olympia to see the work of Phidias,This work was the colossal chryselephantine statue of Zeus (Jupiter) by Phidias, which was at Olympia. This wonderful work is described by Pausanias (Eliaca, A, 11). and all of you think it a misfortune to die without having seen such things. But when there is no need to take a journey, and where a man is, there he has the works (of God) before him, will you not desire to see and understand them? Will you not perceive eitherCompare Persius, Sat. iii, 66— "Discite, io, miseri et causas cognoscite rerum, Quid sumus aut quidnam victuri gign mur. what you are,