hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 154 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 12 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray). You can also browse the collection for Munich (Bavaria, Germany) or search for Munich (Bavaria, Germany) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray), line 137 (search)
th none Offer? Must I do everything, one hand Alone, to save our allies and our land? [A lean dark man pushes forward from the back. DOLON P. 10, l. 150 ff., Dolon.]-The name is derived from dolos, "craft." In our version of Homer Dolon merely wears, over his tunic, the skin of a grey wolf. He has a leather cap and a bow. In the play he goes, as Red Indian spies used to go, actually disguised as a wolf, on all fours in a complete wolf-skin. The same version is found on the Munich cylix of the early vase-painter Euphronius (about 500 B.C.), in which Dolon wears a tight-fitting hairy skin with a long tail. The plan can of course only succeed in a country where wild animals are common enough to be thought unimportant. The playwright has evidently chosen a more primitive and romantic version of the story; the Homeric reviser has, as usual, cut out what might seem ridiculous. (See J. A. K. Thomson in Classical Review, xxv. pp. 238 f.). I, Prince!-I offer for our Cit