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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 98 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 48 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 32 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 32 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 26 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 26 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 24 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 22 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 22 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Syria (Syria) or search for Syria (Syria) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 29 (search)
riage? With this final appeal cf. Catul. 9.10n. urbis: etc. see Crit. App. socer generque: perhaps with a sneer at the political interests that dictated the marriage of Caesar's daughter to a man over twenty years her senior, who had lately divorced his wife on suspicion of adultery with Caesar himself. Yet the marriage had actually proved a very happy one on both sides. perdidistis omnia: the familiar cry of the optimates at this time, when they had become more estranged from their former idol, Pompey, by events following upon the famous council of the so-called triumvirs at Luca in 56 B.C., in accordance with which Pompey and Crassus were this year consuls, with the government of Spain and Syria respectively to follow, while Caesar had just had his command in Gaul extended for five years.
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 45 (search)
anniasque: the allusion suggests that the poem was composed in 55 B.C., for in that year Caesar invaded Britain and Crassus took command in Syria. Syria was proverbially a country of great wealth, and Britain was supposed to be so till the expedition of Caesar proved it otherwise (cf.Syria was proverbially a country of great wealth, and Britain was supposed to be so till the expedition of Caesar proved it otherwise (cf. Cic. Fam. 7.7.1 in Britannia nihil esse audio neque auri neque argenti (to Trebatius after the expedition); Att. 4.16.7 Britannici belli exitus exspectatur; … etiam illud iam cognitum est, neque argenti scripulum esse ullum in illa insula neque praedae nisi ex mancipiis ). The plural is used to indicate, not the several parts of the countries themselves, but such rich countries as Syria and Britain; cf. Prop. 3.16.10 alias Illyrias . facit: etc. i.e. centres all her affections.
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 66 (search)
(reigned 247-222 B.C.), king of Egypt, had for her husband's safety vowed to the gods a lock of her hair, when, shortly after his accession to the throne and marriage, the king was setting out on an expedition against Syria. Upon his safe return the vow was paid, and the tress deposited in the temple of the deified Arsinoe on the promontory of Zephyrion. Next morning, however, it had disappeared; but the anger of the king was appeased by . 2.11.16, etc. The war was to avenge the murder of Berenice, sister of Ptolemy Euergetes and widow of Antiochus Theos, by her step-son Seleucus Callinicus, who had in 246 B.C. succeeded his father on the throne of Syria. parentum gaudia: i.e. in their hope of descendants; cf. Catul. 64.379 f. ita me divi iverint: cf. Catul. 61.196; Catul. 97.1; and with the hyperbaton, Catul. 44.9. With
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 84 (search)
. 243 infimo loco natus ). The point of liber as an adjective and not a proper name is then clear, if infimo loco be understood of the condition of slavery: his maternal uncle (perhaps only one of his uncles on that side) was a libertus, and the social standing of the entire family is thus indicated. misso: sc. on some public service; perhaps with his friend Crassus, who assumed the governorship of Syria in 55 B.C. audibant: with the form cf. Catul. 64.319n. custodibant. leniter et leviter: i. e. though the people left behind misused aspirates, they did not at any rate bellow out so horribly their mispronunciations. postilla: a word of older Latin for the later postea, perhaps, however, still used colloquially in the time of Catullus. Ionios