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Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 56 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 50 0 Browse Search
The Venerable Bede, Historiam ecclesiasticam gentis Anglorum (ed. Charles Plummer) 24 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 18 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 12 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Great Britain (United Kingdom) or search for Great Britain (United Kingdom) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 11 (search)
ce to his passage of the river from Gaul into Germany (cf. Caes. B. G. 4.16 ff.) horribile aequor: the proverbially rough English channel. ultimos: cf. Catul. 29.4 Catul. 29.12; Hor. Carm. 1.35.29 serves iturum Caesarem in ultimos orbis Britannos ; Verg. Ecl. 1.66 penitus toto divisos orbe Britannos. The preliminary invasion of Britain took place in the late summer of 55 B.C. Apparently Furius and Aurelius, at the suggestion of Lesbia, tendered their services in bringing about a reconciliation with her; but Catullus thoroughly despises them for their actions in the past (cf. Intr. 37), and employs them as comites on only one, and that a final, errand, - to convey to Lesbia his decision against her appeal. meae puellae: in h
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 29 (search)
alienating the optimates; cf. Intr. 38. The poem was written after the first invasion of Britain (cf. vv. 4, 12, 20), which took place in 55 B.C., and during the lifetime of Juliatul. 11.11n. Caesar took command in Gaul in 58 B.C., and the first entry into Britain was made in the summer of 55 (cf. Caes. BG 4.20ff.). On the lengthening of the shall he come back to Italy newly enriched from the conquests in Gaul and Britain, and carry on more insolently than ever his life of debauchery? ildest rumors had long been afloat about the vast wealth to be found in the interior of Britain, and many young Roman spendthrifts had desired to join Caesar's expedition therorts have just arrived of the completed conquest of Gaul and of the invasion of Britain, and the same fate now threatens them that befell former conquests, —to be devo
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 45 (search)
ul. 51.5. Syrias Britanniasque: the allusion suggests that the poem was composed in 55 B.C., for in that year Caesar invaded Britain and Crassus took command in Syria. Syria was proverbially a country of great wealth, and Britain was supposed to be so till the exBritain was supposed to be so till the expedition of Caesar proved it otherwise (cf. Cic. Fam. 7.7.1 in Britannia nihil esse audio neque auri neque argenti (to Trebatius after the expedition); Att. 4.16.7 Britannici belli exitus exspectatur; … etiam illud iam cognitum est, neque argenti scripulumncipiis ). The plural is used to indicate, not the several parts of the countries themselves, but such rich countries as Syria and Britain; cf. Prop. 3.16.10 alias Illyrias . facit: etc. i.e. centres all her affections. de