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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 554 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 226 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 154 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 150 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 138 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 92 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 54 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 50 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 46 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Egypt (Egypt) or search for Egypt (Egypt) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 11 (search)
m exsilvisse sagittas. septemgeminus: as having seven mouths; cf. Verg. A. 6.800 septemgemini ostia Nili ; Ov. Met. 1.422 ubi deseruit madidos septemfluus agros Nilus ; Ov. Met. 5.187 genitum septemplice Nilo. colorat aequora: by its muddy waters, which, in their overflow, still fertilize the fields of Egypt; cf. Verg. G. 4.291 [Nilus] viridem Aegyptum nigra fecundat harena. In this and the two following verses is a trace of the reconciliation of Catullus to Caesar; cf. Intr. 38ff. The poet could not yet sing Caesar's praises unreservedly, though he might have done so had he lived longer; but he has already yielded from his earlier position ofunmixed censure. monimenta
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 17 (search)
humorous application to inanimate objects pes being commonly used in such connections. ponticuli: the diminutive implies the general worthlessness of the whole structure. assulis redivivis: second-hand sticks. supinus eat: tumble flat; apparently a colloquial expression; the adjective is used in this sense of the sea in Plin. NH 9.2, and of the alluvial plains of Egypt in Plin. Pan. 30. cava: deep; cf. Catul. 95.5; Ov. Met. 6.371 tota cava submergere membra palude. sic fiat, … da: with this form of conditional wish cf. Hor. Carm. 1.3.1 ff. sic te diva regat, Vergilium reddas ; Verg. Ecl. 9.30 ff. sic distendant ubera vaccae, incipe. Martial imitates in Mart. 7.93.8 perpetu
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 66 (search)
it is due to lack of care on the part of the translator, or to an excessive fidelity to the original, cannot be determined; but the general characteristics of Alexandrian poetry would lead us to refer the fault to Callimachus himself. The theme, a compound of court tradition and of astronomical knowledge, is as follows: Berenice, daughter of Magas, king of Cyrene, and wife of her cousin Ptolemy Euergetes (reigned 247-222 B.C.), king of Egypt, had for her husband's safety vowed to the gods a lock of her hair, when, shortly after his accession to the throne and marriage, the king was setting out on an expedition against Syria. Upon his safe return the vow was paid, and the tress deposited in the temple of the deified Arsinoe on the promontory of Zephyrion. Next morning, however, it had disappeared; but the anger of the king was appeased by the court astronomer, Conon, who said that