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Strabo, Geography 4 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Sir Richard Francis Burton) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge). You can also browse the collection for Ancona (Italy) or search for Ancona (Italy) in all documents.

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M. Tullius Cicero, For Aulus Cluentius (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 14 (search)
What more? Did not your father, O Oppianicus, beyond all question, murder your grandmother Dinea, whose heir you are? who, when he had brought to her his own physician, a well-tried man and often victorious, (by whose means indeed he had slain many of his enemies,) exclaimed that she positively would not be attended by that man, through whose attention she had lost all her friends. Then immediately he goes to a man of Ancona, Lucius Clodius, a travelling quack, who had come by accident at that time to Larinum, and arranges with him for four hundred sesterces, as was shown at the time by his account-books. Lucius Clodius, being a man in a hurry, as he had many more market towns to visit, did the business off-hand, as soon as he was introduced; he took the woman off with the first draught he gave her, and did not stay at Larinum a moment afterwards. When this Dinea was making her will, Oppianicus, who was her son-in-law,