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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 14 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams). You can also browse the collection for Palatine (Italy) or search for Palatine (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 8, line 306 (search)
Such worship o'er, all take the homeward way back to the town. The hospitable King, though bowed with weight of years, kept at his side Aeneas and his son, and as they fared, with various discourse beguiled the way. Aeneas scanned with quick-admiring eyes the region wide, and lingered with delight now here, now there, inquiring eagerly of each proud monument of heroes gone. Then King Evander, he who builded first On Palatine, spoke thus: “These groves erewhile their native nymphs and fauns enjoyed, with men from trees engendered and stout heart of oak. Nor laws nor arts they knew; nor how to tame burls to the yoke, nor fill great barns with store and hoard the gathered grain; but rudely fared on wild fruits and such food as hunters find. Then Saturn from Olympian realms came down, in flight from Jove's dread arms, his sceptre lost, and he an exiled King. That savage race he gathered from the mountain slopes; and gave wise laws and statutes; so that latent land was Latium, ‘hid land’,<
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 9, line 1 (search)
While thus in distant region moves the war, down to bold Turnus Saturn's daughter sends celestial Iris. In a sacred vale, the seat of worship at his grandsire's tomb, Pilumnus, Faunus' son, the hero mused. And thus the wonder-child of Thaumas called with lips of rose: “O Turnus, what no god dared give for reward of thy fondest vow, has come unbidden on its destined day. Behold, Aeneas, who has left behind the city with his fleet and followers, is gone to kingly Palatine, the home of good Evander. Yea, his march invades the far Etrurian towns, where now he arms the Lydian rustics. Wilt thou longer muse? Call for thy chariot and steeds! Away! Take yonder tents by terror and surprise!” She spoke; and heavenward on poising wings soared, cleaving as she fled from cloud to cloud a vast, resplendent bow. The warrior saw, and, lifting both his hands, pursued with prayer the fading glory: “Beauteous Iris, hail! Proud ornament of heaven! who sent thee here across yon cloud to earth, and unto me<
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 9, line 224 (search)
Thither in haste arrived the noble pair, brave Nisus with Euryalus his friend, and craved a hearing, for their suit, they said, was urgent and well-worth a patient ear. Iulus to the anxious striplings gave a friendly welcome, bidding Nisus speak. The son of Hyrtacus obeyed: “O, hear, Princes of Teucria, with impartial mind, nor judge by our unseasoned youth the worth of what we bring. Yon Rutule watch is now in drunken sleep, and all is silent there. With our own eyes we picked out a good place to steal a march, that cross-road by the gate close-fronting on the bridge. Their lines of fire are broken, and a murky, rolling smoke fills all the region. If ye grant us leave by this good luck to profit, we will find Aeneas and the walls of Palatine, and after mighty slaughter and huge spoil ye soon shall see us back. Nor need ye fear we wander from the way. Oft have we seen that city's crest loom o'er the shadowy vales, where we have hunted all day long and know each winding of yon river.