hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 102 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 60 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 24 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various). You can also browse the collection for Argive (Greece) or search for Argive (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XIII: Of Juno's Feast. (search)
rgins' locks with golden fillets bound, And sparkling diamonds glitt'ring all around; Buskins embroider'd on their feet they wear, And spreading trains with pride uneasy bear. Here, as in Greece the custom was of old, The image of the goddess we behold Borne on the heads of maidens, and behind The priestesses in beauteous rank you find. An awful silence reigns : the goddess last Approaches, and with her the pomp is past. The dress was Greek, and such Halesus wore, When in a fright he fled the Grecian shore; His father kill'd, an Argive ship he fraught, And to this coast the royal treasure brought. Much peril had he past, much labour known, O'er lands and seas, before he reach'd our own, And landing built, with happy hand, the town, Where first he did this festival revive, And its Greek rules to the Phaliscans give; The rites and sacrifices first he show'd, As practis'd now within this ancient wood. Ah, may these rites to all propitious be, No more to those that serv'd them than to me.