hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding). You can also browse the collection for Cene (Italy) or search for Cene (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 12, line 146 (search)
did bring. Then Nestor sayd: This Cygnet is the person now alone Of your tyme that defyed steele, and could bee perst of none. But I have seene now long ago one Cene of Perrhebye, I sawe one Cene of Perrhebye a thousand woundes defye With unatteynted bodye. In mount Othris he did dwell: And was renowmed for his deedes: (and whiCene of Perrhebye a thousand woundes defye With unatteynted bodye. In mount Othris he did dwell: And was renowmed for his deedes: (and which in him ryght well A greater woonder did appeere) he was a woman borne. This uncouth made them all much more amazed than beforne, And every man desyred him to tell it. And among The rest, Achilles sayd: Declare, I pray thee (for wee long To heare it every one of us), O eloquent old man, The wisedome of our age: what was that Cene and how he wan Another than his native shape, and in what rode, or in What fyght or skirmish, tweene you first acquaintance did beegin, And who in fyne did vanquish him if any vanquisht him. Then Nestor: Though the length of tyme have made my senses dim, And dyvers things erst seene in youth now out of mynd be gone: Y
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 12, line 429 (search)
ll well I doo remember that Cymelius threw a dart Which lyghted full in Nesseyes flank about his privie part. And think not you that Mops, the sonne of Ampycus, could doo No good but onely prophesye. This stout Odites whoo Had bothe the shapes of man and horse, by Mopsis dart was slayne, And labouring for to speake his last he did but strive in vayne. For Mopsis dart togither nayld his toong and neather chappe, And percing through his throte did make a wyde and deadly gappe. Fyve men had Cene already slayne: theyr wounds I cannot say: The names and nomber of them all ryght well I beare away. The names of them were Stiphelus, and Brome, and Helimus, Pyracmon with his forest bill, and stout Antimachus. Out steppes the biggest Centawre there, huge Latreus, armed in Alesus of Aemathias spoyle slayne late before by him. His yeeres were mid tweene youth and age, his courage still was yoong, And on his abrun head hore heares peerd heere and there amoong. His furniture was then a swoor