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Polybius, Histories 296 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 36 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 22 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 22 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 18 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 18 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 18 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 12 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for Carthage (Tunisia) or search for Carthage (Tunisia) in all documents.

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Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 13 (search)
ake himself sovereign of the whole of Numidia. Adherbal, though he had sent embassadors to Rome, to inform the senate of his brother's murder and his own circumstances, yet, relying on the number of his troops, prepared for an armed resistance. When the matter, however, came to a contest, he was defeated, and fled from the field of battle into our province,XIII. Into our province] In Provinciam. "The word province, in this place, signifies that part of Africa which, after the destruction of Carthage, fell to the Romans by the right of conquest, in opposition to the kingdom of Micipsa."Wasse. and from thence hastened to Rome. Jugurtha, having thus accomplished his purposes,Having thus accomplished his purposes] Patratis consiliis. After consiliis, in all the manuscripts, occur the words postquam omnis Numidiœ potiebatur, which were struck out by Cortius, as being turpissima glossa. The recent editors, Gerlach, Kritz, Dietsch, and Bernouf, have restored them. and reflecting, at leisure,
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 14 (search)
manu, fuit is simply in potestate fuit.--Ter. Hec., iv. 4, 44: Uxor quid faciat in manu non est meâ."Cortius. I have fled to you, Conscript Fathers, to whom, what is the most grievous of all things, I am compelled to become a burden before I have been an assistance. "Other princes have been received into your friendship after having been conquered in war, or have solicited an alliance with you in circumstances of distress; but our family commenced its league with the Romans in the war with Carthage, at a time when their faith was a greater object of attraction than their fortune. Suffer not, then, O Conscript Fathers, a descendent of that family to implore aid from you in vain. If I had no other plea for obtaining your assistance but my wretched fortune; nothing to urge, but that, having been recently a king, powerful by birth, by character, and by resources, I am now dishonored, afflicted,Dishonored, afflicted] Deformatus œrumnis. destitute, and dependent on the aid of others, it wou
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 18 (search)
That is, of the Persians and Getulians united. the power rapidly increased; and at length, the children, through excess of population, separating from the parents, they took possession, under the name of Numidians, of those regions bordering on Carthage which are now called Numidia. In process of time, the two parties,The two parties] Utrique. The older Numidians, and the younger, who had emigrated toward Carthage. each assisting the other, reduced the neighboring tribes, by force or fear, undeCarthage. each assisting the other, reduced the neighboring tribes, by force or fear, under their sway; but those who had spread toward our sea, made the greater conquests: for the Lybians are less warlike than the Getulians.Those who had spread toward our sea--for the Libyans are less warlike than the Getulians] Magis hi, qui ad nostrum mare processerant ; quia Libyes quám Gœtuli minùs bellicosi. The Persians and Getulians (under the name of Numidians), and their colonists, who were more toward the Mediterranean, and were more warlike than the Libyans (who were united with the Medes
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 19 (search)
the places are named, as has already been observed by Cortius."Kritzius. Adrumetum, Leptis,Leptis] There were two cities of this name. Leptis Major, now Lebida, lay between the two Syrtes; Leptis Minor, now Lempta, between the smaller Sytis and Carthage. It is the latter that is meant here, and in c. 77, 78. and other cities, on the sea-coast; which, soon growing powerful, became partly a support, and partly an honor, to their parent state. Of Carthage I think it better to be silent, than to saCarthage I think it better to be silent, than to say but little; especially as time bids me hasten to other matters. Next to the Catabathmos,Next to the Catabathmos] Ad Catabathmon. Ad means, on the side of the country toward the Catabathmos. "Catabathmon initium ponens Sallustius ab eo discedit."Kritzius. then, which divides Egypt from Africa, the first city along the sea-coastAlong the sea-coast] Secundo mari. "Si quis secundum mare pergat."Wasse. is Cyrene, a colony of Theræans;Of Theræans] Therœôn. From the island of Thera, one of the Sporad