hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 236 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 106 0 Browse Search
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves. 88 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 38 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 30 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 26 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for Africa or search for Africa in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 13 (search)
The report of so atrocious an outrage was soon spread through Africa. Fear seized on Adherbal, and on all who had been subject to Micipsa. The Numidians divided into two parties, the greater number following Adherbal, but the more warlike, Jugurtha; who, accordingly, armed as large a force as he could, brought several cities, partly by force and partly by their own consent, under his power, and prepared to make himself sovereign of the whole of Numidia. Adherbal, though he had sent embassadors prepared for an armed resistance. When the matter, however, came to a contest, he was defeated, and fled from the field of battle into our province,XIII. Into our province] In Provinciam. "The word province, in this place, signifies that part of Africa which, after the destruction of Carthage, fell to the Romans by the right of conquest, in opposition to the kingdom of Micipsa."Wasse. and from thence hastened to Rome. Jugurtha, having thus accomplished his purposes,Having thus accomplished his
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 17 (search)
My subject seems to require of me, in this place, a brief account of the situation of Africa, and of those nations in it with whom we have had war or alliances. But of those tracts and countries, which, from their heat, or difficulty of access, or act description. Of the rest I shall speak with all possible brevity. In the division of the earth, most writers consider Africa as a third part; a few admit only two divisions, Asia and Europe,XVII. Only two divisions Asia and Europe] Thus Varro, de the heaven is divided into regions, and the earth into Asia and Europe." See Broukh. ad Tibull., iv. 1, 176. and include Africa in Europe. It is bounded, on the west, by the strait connecting our sea with the ocean;The strait connecting our sea withse finds but few victims. Animals of a venomous nature they have in great numbers. Concerning the original inhabitants of Africa, the settlers that afterward joined them, and the manner in which they intermingled, I shall offer the following brief ac
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 18 (search)
Africa, then, was originally occupied by the Getulians and Libyans,XVIII. Getulians and Libyans] Gœtuli et Libyes. "See Pompon. Mel. i. 4; Plin. H. N. v. 4, 6, 8, v. 2, xxi. 13; Herod. iv. 159, 168. Greek writers properly to the Africans of the North coast, but frequently to the inhabitants of Africa in general. rude and uncivilized tribes, who subsisted on the flesh of wild animals, or, like ca from certain companions of Hercules. The point is not worth discussion. having sailed over into Africa, occupied the parts nearest to our sea.Our sea] The Mediterranean. See above, c. 17. The Persiaclearly the sense, as deducible from the preceding portion of the text. At last nearly all lower Africa/un>Lower Africa] Africa pars inferior. The part nearest to the sea. The ancients called the mariAfrica] Africa pars inferior. The part nearest to the sea. The ancients called the maritime parts of a country the lower parts, and the inland parts the higher, taking the notion, probably, from the course of the rivers. Lower Egypt was the part at the mouth of the Nile. was occupied by
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 19 (search)
, and in c. 77, 78. and other cities, on the sea-coast; which, soon growing powerful, became partly a support, and partly an honor, to their parent state. Of Carthage I think it better to be silent, than to say but little; especially as time bids me hasten to other matters. Next to the Catabathmos,Next to the Catabathmos] Ad Catabathmon. Ad means, on the side of the country toward the Catabathmos. "Catabathmon initium ponens Sallustius ab eo discedit."Kritzius. then, which divides Egypt from Africa, the first city along the sea-coastAlong the sea-coast] Secundo mari. "Si quis secundum mare pergat."Wasse. is Cyrene, a colony of Theræans;Of Theræans] Therœôn. From the island of Thera, one of the Sporades, in the Ægean Sea, now called Santorin. Battus was the leader of the colony. See Herod., iv. 145; Strab., xvii. 3; Pind. Pyth., iv. after which are the two Syrtes,Two Syrtes] See c. 78. with LeptisLeptis] That is, Leptis Major. See above on this c. between them; then the Altars of the Ph