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Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 24 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1860., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for Numidia (Algeria) or search for Numidia (Algeria) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 8 document sections:

Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 5 (search)
Scipio, who, from his merits was afterward surnamed Africanus, had performed for us many eminent exploits in the field. In return for which services, after the Carthaginians were subdued, and after Syphax,Syphax] "He was King of the Masæsyli in Numidia; was at first an enemy to the Carthaginians (Liv. xxiv. 48), and afterward their friend (Liv. xxviii. 17). He then changed sides again, and made a treaty with Scipio ; but having at length been offered the hand of Sophonisba, the daughter of Asded. Masinissa's friendship for us, accordingly, remained faithful and inviolate; his reignHis reign] Imperii. Cortius thinks that the grant of the Romans ceased with the life of Masinissa, and that his son Micipsa, reigned only over that part of Numidia which originally belonged to his father. But in this opinion succeeding commentators have generally supposed him to be mistaken. and his life ended together. His son, Micipsa, alone succeeded to his kingdom; Mastanabal and Gulussa, his two broth
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 8 (search)
There were at that time, in our army, a number of officers, some of low, and some of high birth, to whom wealth was more attractive than virtue or honor; men who were attached to certain parties, and of consequence in their own country; but, among the allies, rather distinguished than respected. These persons inflamed the mind of Jugurtha, of itself sufficiently aspiring, by assuring him, "that if Micipsa should die, he might have the kingdom of Numidia to himself; for that he was possessed of eminent merit, and that any thing might be purchased at Rome." When Numantia, however, was destroyed, and Scipio had determined to dismiss the auxiliary troops, and to return to Rome, he led Jugurtha, after having honored him, in a public assembly, with the noblest presents and applauses, into his own tent; where he privately admonished him "to court the friendship of the Romans rather by attention to them as a body, than by practicing on individuals;VIII. Rather by attention to them as a body
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 12 (search)
r. "The proximus lictor was he who, when the lictors walked before the prince or magistrate in a regular line, one behind the other, was last, or next to the person on whom they attended."Cortius. He would thus be ready to receive the great man's commands, and be in immediate communication with him. We must suppose either that Sallust merely speaks in conformity with the practice of the Romans, or, what is more probable, that the Roman custom of being preceded by lictors had been adopted in Numidia. had always been liked and favored by his master. This man, thus opportunely presented as an instrument, Jugurtha loaded with promises, and induced him to go to his house, as if for the purpose of looking over it, and provide himself with false keys to the gates; for the true ones used to be given to Hiempsal; adding, that he himself, when circumstances should call for his presence, would be at the place with a large body of men. This commission the Numidian speedily executed, and, accordin
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 13 (search)
wing Adherbal, but the more warlike, Jugurtha; who, accordingly, armed as large a force as he could, brought several cities, partly by force and partly by their own consent, under his power, and prepared to make himself sovereign of the whole of Numidia. Adherbal, though he had sent embassadors to Rome, to inform the senate of his brother's murder and his own circumstances, yet, relying on the number of his troops, prepared for an armed resistance. When the matter, however, came to a contest, heputies had arrived at Rome, and had sent large presents, according to the prince's direction, to his intimate friends,His intimate friends] Hospitibus. Persons probably with whom he had been intimate at Numantia, or who had since visited him in Numidia. and to others whose influence was at that time powerful, so remarkable a change ensued, that Jugurtha, from being an object of the greatest odium, grew into great regard and favor with the nobility; who, partly allured with hope, and partly wit
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 14 (search)
"My father Micipsa, Conscript Fathers, enjoined me, on his death-bed, to look upon the kingdom of Numidia as mine only by deputation;XIV. By deputation] Procuratione. He was to consider himself only the procurator, manager, or deputed governor, of the kingdom. to consider the right and authority as belonging to you; to endeavor, at home and in the field, to be as serviceable to the Roman people as possible; and to regard you as my kindred and relatives:Kindred--and relatives] Cognatorum--affiram. Cic. pro Plane., c. 42; Per vos, per fortunas vestras. for your children, and for your parents, and by the majesty of the Roman people, to grant me succor in my distress, to arrest the progress of injustice, and not to suffer the kingdom of Numidia, which is your own property, to sink into ruinTo sink into ruin] Tabescere. "Paullatim interire."Cortius. Lucret. ii. 1172: Omnia paullatim tabescere el ire Ad capulum. "This speech," says Gerlach, "though of less weighty argument than the other
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 16 (search)
Plane. 28. a man of distinction, and of great influence at that time in the senate, from having in his consulship, on the death of Caius Gracchus and Marcus Fulvius Flaccus, prosecuted the victory of the nobility over the plebeians with great severity. Jugurtha, though he had already counted Scaurus among his friends at Rome, yet received him with the most studied ceremony, and, by presents and promises, wrought on him so effectually, that he preferred the prince's interest to his own character, honor, and all other considerations. The rest of the commissioners he assailed in a similar way, and gained over most of them; by a few only integrity was more regarded than lucre. In the division of the kingdom, that part of Numidia which borders on Mauretania, and which is superior in fertility and population, was allotted to Jugurtha; of the other part, which, though better furnished with harbors and buildings, was more valuable in appearance than in reality, Adherbal became the possessor.
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 17 (search)
for disease finds but few victims. Animals of a venomous nature they have in great numbers. Concerning the original inhabitants of Africa, the settlers that afterward joined them, and the manner in which they intermingled, I shall offer the following brief account, which, though it differs from the general opinion, is that which was interpreted to me from the Punic volumes said to have belonged to King Hiempsal,King Hiempsal] "This is not the prince that was murdered by Jugurtha, but the king who succeeded him; he was grandson of Masinissa, son of Gulussa, and father of Juba. After Juba was killed at Thapsus, Cæsar reduced Numidia to the condition of a province, and appointed Sallust over it, who had thus opportunities of gaining a knowledge of the country, and of consulting the books written in the language of it."Bernouf. and which the inhabitants of that country believe to be consistent with fact. For the truth of the statement, however, the writers themselves must be responsible
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 18 (search)
by the Getulians and Libyans,XVIII. Getulians and Libyans] Gœtuli et Libyes. "See Pompon. Mel. i. 4; Plin. H. N. v. 4, 6, 8, v. 2, xxi. 13; Herod. iv. 159, 168."Gerlach The name Gœtuli, is, however, unknown to Herodotus. They lay to the south of Numidia and Mauretania. See Strabo, xvii. 3. Libyes is a term applied by the Greek writers properly to the Africans of the North coast, but frequently to the inhabitants of Africa in general. rude and uncivilized tribes, who subsisted on the flesh of wiGetulians united. the power rapidly increased; and at length, the children, through excess of population, separating from the parents, they took possession, under the name of Numidians, of those regions bordering on Carthage which are now called Numidia. In process of time, the two parties,The two parties] Utrique. The older Numidians, and the younger, who had emigrated toward Carthage. each assisting the other, reduced the neighboring tribes, by force or fear, under their sway; but those who h