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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 32 32 Browse Search
Xenophon, Hellenica (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 7 7 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 2 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 2 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 2 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 1 1 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 41-50 1 1 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.). You can also browse the collection for 403 BC or search for 403 BC in all documents.

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Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VII. We here enter upon the third division of Pliny's Natural History, which treats of Zoology, from the 7th to the 11th inclusive. Cuvier has illustrated this part by many valuable notes, which originally appeared in Lemaire's Bibliotheque Classique, 1827, and were afterwards incorporated, with some additions, by Ajasson, in his translation of Pliny, published in 1829; Ajasson is the editor of this portion of Pliny's Natural History, in Lemaire's Edition.—B. MAN, HIS BIRTH, HIS ORGANIZATION, AND THE INVENTION OF THE ARTS., CHAP. 31. (30.)—MEN WHO HAVE BEEN REMARKABLE FOR WISDOM. (search)
d at Eion, on the mouth of the Strymon, the evening of the same day on which Amphipolis surrendered: and though too late to save Amphipolis, prevented Eion from falling into the hands of the enemy. It was in consequence of this failure, that he became voluntarily an exile, perhaps to avoid the still severer punishment of death, which appears to have been the penalty of such a failure as that which he had, though unavoidably, committed. It is most probable that he returned to Athens about B.C. 403, the period of its liberation by Thrasybulus. A strong testimony, too, was given to the merit of Menander, the famous comic poet, by the kings of Egypt and Macedonia, in sending to him a fleet and an embassy; though, what was still more honourable to him, he preferred enjoying the converse of his literary pursuits to the favour of kings. The nobles too of Rome have given their testimonies in favour of foreigners, even. Cn. Pompeius, after having finished the war against Mithridates, when he w