Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Virginia (Virginia, United States) or search for Virginia (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 152 results in 31 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the ship called the Marigold of M. Hill of Redrife unto Cape Briton and beyond to the latitude of 44 degrees and an half, 1593 Written by Richard fisher Master Hilles man of Redriffe. (search)
ood smell, and divers good for the skurvie, and grasse very ranke and of great length. Wee sawe five or sixe boates sayling to the Southwestwardes of Cape Briton, which wee judged to bee Christians, which had some trade that way. Wee sawe also, while wee were on shore, the manner of their hanging up of their fish and flesh with withes to dry in the ayre: they also lay them upon raftes and hurdles and make a smoake under them, or a softe fire, and so drie them as the Savages use to doe in Virginia . While wee lay foure leagues South of Cape Briton wee sounded and had sixtie fathomes black ozie ground. And sayling thence Westwarde nine or ten leagues off the shore, we had twenty foure fathomes redde sande, and small whitish stones. Wee continued our course so farre to the Southwest, that wee brought our selves into the latitude of fourtie foure degrees and an half, having sayled fiftie or sixtie leagues to the Southwest of Cape Briton. We found the current betwene this Cape Briton
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage made to the coasts of America , with two barks, where in were Captaines M. Philip Amadas, and M. Arthur Barlowe, who discovered part of the Countrey now called Virginia , Anno 1584. Written by one of the said Captaines, and sent to sir Walter Ralegh knight, at whose charge and direction, the said voyage was set forth. (search)
The first voyage made to the coasts of America , with two barks, where in were Captaines M. Philip Amadas, and M. Arthur Barlowe, who discovered part of the Countrey now called Virginia , Anno 1584. Written by one of the said Captaines, and sent to sir Walter Ralegh knight, at whose charge and direction, the said voyage was set forth.THE 27 day of Aprill, in the yeere of our redemption, 1584 we departed the West of England, with two barkes well furnished with men and victuals, having received our last and perfect directions by your letters, confirming the former instructions, and commandements delivered by your selfe at our leaving the river of Thames . And I thinke it a matter both unnecessary, for the manifest discoverie of the Countrey, as also for tediousnesse sake, to remember unto you the diurnall of our course, sayling thither and returning: onely I have presumed to present unto you this briefe discourse, by which you may judge how profitable this land is likely to succeede, as
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage made by Sir Richard Greenvile, for Sir Walter Ralegh, to Virginia , in the yeere 1585. (search)
The voiage made by Sir Richard Greenvile, for Sir Walter Ralegh, to Virginia , in the yeere 1585. THE 9. day of April, in the yeere abovesayd, we departed from Plymmouth, our Fleete consisting of the number of seven sailes, to wit, the Tyger, of the burden of seven score tunnes, a Flie-boat called the Roe-bucke, of the like burden, the Lyon of a hundred tunnes or thereabouts, the Elizabeth, of fiftie tunnes, and the Dorothie, a small barke: whereunto were also adjoyned for speedy services, two small pinnesses. The principall Gentlemen of our companie, were these, M. Ralph Lane, M. Tomas Candish, M. John Arundell, M. Raymund, M. Stukeley, M. Bremige, M. Vincent, and M. John Clarke, and divers others, whereof some were Captaines, and other some Assistants for counsell, and good directions in the voyage. The 14. day of Aprill wee fell with Lancerota and Forteventura, Isles of the Canaries, and from thence we continued our course for Dominica , one of the Antiles of the West India,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The names of those as well Gentlemen as others, that remained one whole yeere in Virginia , under the Governement of Master Ralph Lane. (search)
The names of those as well Gentlemen as others, that remained one whole yeere in Virginia , under the Governement of Master Ralph Lane. MASTER PHILIP AMADAS, Admirall of the countrey. Master Hariot. Master Acton. Master Edward Stafford. Thomas Luddington. Master Marvyn. Master Gardiner. Captaine Vaughan. Master Kendall. Master Prideox. Robert Holecroft. Rise Courtney. Richard Gilbert. Steven Pomarie. John Brocke. Bennet Harrie. James Stevenson. Charles Stevenson. Christopher Lowde. Jeremie Man. James Mason. David Salter. Richard Ireland. Thomas Bookener. William Philips. Master Hugh Rogers. Master Thomas Harvie. Master Snelling. Master Anthony Russe. Master Allyne. Master Michael Polison. John Cage. Thomas Parre. William Randes. Gefferey Churchman. William Farthow. John Taylor. Philip Robyns. Thomas P
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An extract of Master Ralph Lanes letter to M. Richard Hakluyt Esquire, and another Gentleman of the middle Temple, from Virginia . (search)
An extract of Master Ralph Lanes letter to M. Richard Hakluyt Esquire, and another Gentleman of the middle Temple, from Virginia . IN the meane while you shall understand, that since Sir Richard Greenvils departure from us, as also before, we have discovered the maine to be the goodliest oyle under the cope of heaven, so abounding nesse, and very well peopled and towned, though savagely, and the climate so wholsome, that wee had not one sicke since we touched the land here. To conclude, if Virginia had but horses and kine in some reasonable proportion, I dare assure my selfe being inhabited with English, no realme in Christendome were comparable to it. For all, so it be made red. Thus good M. Hakluyt and M. H. I have joyned you both in one letter of remembrance, as two that I love dearely well, and commending me most heartily to you both, I commit you to the tuition of the Almightie. From the new Fort in Virginia , this third of September, 1585.Your most assured friend RALPH LANE.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An account of the particularities of the imployments of the English men left in Virginia by Sir Richard Greenevill under the charge of Master Ralph Lane Generall of the same, from the 17. of August 1585. until the 18. of June 1586. at which time they departed the Countrey: sent and directed to Sir Walter Ralegh. (search)
An account of the particularities of the imployments of the English men left in Virginia by Sir Richard Greenevill under the charge of Master Ralph Lane Generall of the same, from the 17. of August 1585. until the 18. of June 1586. at which time they departed the Countrey: sent and directed to Sir Walter Ralegh.THAT I may proceede with order in this discourse, I thinke it requisite to divide in into two parts. The first shall declare the particularities of such parts of the Countrey within the maine, as our weake number, and supply of things necessarie did inable us to enter into the discovery of. The second part shall set downe the reasons generally moving us to resolve on our departure at the instant with the Generall Sir Francis Drake, and our common request for passage with him, when the barkes, pinnesses, and boates with the Masters and Mariners meant by him to bee left in the Countrey, for the supply of such, as for a further time meant to have stayed there, were caryed awa
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third voyage made by a ship sent in the yeere 1586, to the reliefe of the Colony planted in Virginia , at the sole charges of Sir Walter Ralegh. (search)
The third voyage made by a ship sent in the yeere 1586, to the reliefe of the Colony planted in Virginia , at the sole charges of Sir Walter Ralegh.IN the yeere of our Lord 1586 Sir Walter Ralegh at his owne charge prepared a ship of an hundred tunne, fraighted with all maner of things in most plentifull maner, for the supply and reliefe of his Colony then remaining in Virginia : but before they set saile from England it was after Easter, so that our Colony halfe despaired of the comming of any supply: wherefore every man prepared for himselfe, determining resolutely to spend the residue of their life time in that countrey. And for the better performance ofe from the sacking of Sant Domingo, Cartagena , and Saint Augustine, determined in his way homeward to visit his countreymen the English Colony then remaining in Virginia . So passing along the coasts of Florida , he fell with the parts where our English Colony inhabited: and having espied some of that company, there he ankered and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Rafe Lane one of her Majesties Esquiers, and Governour of the Colony in Virginia , above mentioned, for the time there resident, to the gentle Reader wisheth all happinesse in the Lord. (search)
Rafe Lane one of her Majesties Esquiers, and Governour of the Colony in Virginia , above mentioned, for the time there resident, to the gentle Reader wisheth all happinesse in the Lord.ALBEIT (gentle Reader) the credit of the reports in this Treatise contained can little be furthered by the testimony of one as my selfe, through affection judged partiall, though without desert: neverthelesse, forsomuch as I have bene requested by some my particular friends, who conceive more rightly of me, to deliver freely my knowledge of the same, not onely for the satisfying of them, but also for the true information of any other whosoever, that comes not with a prejudicate minde to the reading thereof: thus much upon my credit I am to affirme, that things universally are so truely set downe in this Treatise by the authour thereof, an actor in the Colony, and a man no lesse for his honesty then learning commendable, as that I dare boldly avouch, it may very well passe with the credit of trueth ev
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, To the Adventurers, Favourers, and Welwillers of the enterprise for the inhabiting and planting in Virginia . (search)
To the Adventurers, Favourers, and Welwillers of the enterprise for the inhabiting and planting in Virginia .SINCE the first undertaking by Sir Walter Ralegh to deale in the action of discovering of that countrey which is now called and knowen by the name of Virginia , many voyages having beene thither made at sundry times to his great charge; as first in the yere 1584, and afterwards in the yeres 1585, 1586, and now of late this last yeere 1587: there have bene divers and variable reports, wiVirginia , many voyages having beene thither made at sundry times to his great charge; as first in the yere 1584, and afterwards in the yeres 1585, 1586, and now of late this last yeere 1587: there have bene divers and variable reports, with some slanderous and shamefull speeches bruted abroad by many that returned from thence: especially of that discovery which was made by the Colony transported by Sir Richard Grinvile in the yere 1585, being of all others the most principall, and as yet of most effect, the time of their abode in the countrey being a whole yere, when as in the other voyage before they stayed but sixe weeks, and the others after were onely for supply and transportation, nothing more being discovered then had ben
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first part of Merchantable commodities. (search)
good silke in forme of a thin glittering skin to be stript off. It groweth two foot & an halfe high or better: the blades are about two foot in length, and halfe an inch broad. The like groweth in Persia , which is in the selfe same climate as Virginia , of which very many of the Silke works that come from thence into Europe are made. Hereof if it be planted and ordered as in Persia , it cannot in reason be otherwise, but that there will rise in short time great profit to the dealers therein,ll finde apt uses for them, as also for other colours which we know to be there. Woad: a thing of so great vent and uses amongst English Diers, which can not be yeelded sufficiently in our owne countrey for spare of ground, may be planted in Virginia , there being ground enough. The growth thereof need not to be doubted, when as in the Islands of the Acores it groweth plentifully, which are in the same climate. So likewise of Madder. We caried thither Suger-canes to plant, which being not
1 2 3 4