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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The miraculous victory atchieved by the English Fleete, under the discreet and happy conduct of the right honourable, right prudent, and valiant lord, the L. Charles Howard, L. high Admirall of England, &c. Upon the Spanish huge Armada sent in the yeere 1588. for the invasion of England, together with the wofull and miserable successe of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15. booke of his history of the low Countreys. (search)
sen Ordinance, in storing up of corne and victuals, in trayning of men to use warlike weapons, in leavying and mustering of souldiers: insomuch that about the beginning of the yeere 1588. he had finished such a mightie Navie, and brought it into Lisbon haven, as never the like had before that time sailed upon the Ocean sea. A very large and particular description of this Navie was put in print and published by the Spaniards; wherein were set downe the number, names, and burthens of the shipnd so the said Justin of Nassau kept such diligent ward in that Station that the duke of Parma could not issue foorth with his navy into the sea out of any part of Flanders. In the meane while the Spanish Armada set saile out of the haven of Lisbon upon the 19. of May, An. Dom. 1588. under the conduct of the duke of Medina Sidonia, directing their course for the Baie of Corunna, alias the Groine of Gallicia, where they tooke in souldiers and warlike provision, this port being in Spaine the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage and travell of M. Caesar Fredericke, Marchant of Venice, into the East India, and beyond the Indies. Wherein are conteined the customes and rites of those countries, the merchandises and commodities, aswell of golde and silver, as spices, drugges, pearles, and other jewels: translated out of Italian by M. Thomas Hickocke. (search)
pe there ready to depart for that voyage. And then wee departed from Pegu to Chatigan a great harbour or port, from whence there goe smal ships to Cochin, before the fleete depart for Portugall, in which ships I was fully determined to goe to Lisbon , and so to Venice . When I had thus resolved my selfe, I went a boord of the shippe of Bengala, at which time it was the yeere of Touffon : concerning which Touffon ye are to understand, that in the East Indies often times, there are not stormesnt die and have his Will made, and hath given order that the schoole of Misericordia shall have his goods and sell them, then they sende the money by exchange to the schoole of Misericordia in Lisbone, with that copie of his Testament, then from Lisbon they give intelligence thereof, into what part of Christendome soever it be, and the heires of such a one comming thither, with testimoniall that they be heires, they shall receive there the value of his goods: in such wise that they shall not l
pe there ready to depart for that voyage. And then wee departed from Pegu to Chatigan a great harbour or port, from whence there goe smal ships to Cochin, before the fleete depart for Portugall, in which ships I was fully determined to goe to Lisbon , and so to Venice . When I had thus resolved my selfe, I went a boord of the shippe of Bengala, at which time it was the yeere of Touffon : concerning which Touffon ye are to understand, that in the East Indies often times, there are not stormesnt die and have his Will made, and hath given order that the schoole of Misericordia shall have his goods and sell them, then they sende the money by exchange to the schoole of Misericordia in Lisbone, with that copie of his Testament, then from Lisbon they give intelligence thereof, into what part of Christendome soever it be, and the heires of such a one comming thither, with testimoniall that they be heires, they shall receive there the value of his goods: in such wise that they shall not l
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage to Guinea set out by Sir George Barne, Sir John Yorke, Thomas Lok, Anthonie Hickman and Edward Castelin, in the yere 1554. The Captaine whereof was M. John Lok. (search)
h as live onely by fish, and were sometimes subdued by the warres of great Alexander. Furthermore the Aethiopians called Rhapsii, & Anthropophagi, yt are accustomed to eat mans flesh, inhabite the regions neere unto the mountains called Montes Lunae (that is) the mountaines of the Moone. Gazatia is under the Tropike of Capricorne. After this followeth the front of Afrike, the Cape of Buena Speranza, or Caput Bonae Spei, that is, the Cape of good hope, by the which they passe that saile from Lisbon to Calicut . But by what names the Capes and gulfes are called, forasmuch as the same are in every globe and card, it were here superfluous to rehearse them. Some write that Africa was so named by the Grecians, because it is without colde. For the Greeke letter Alpha or A signifieth privation, voyd, or without: and Phrice signifieth colde. For in deed although in the stead of Winter they have a cloudy and tempestuous season, yet is it not colde, but rather smoothering hote, with hote s
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. John Lok to the worshipfull company of Marchants adventurers for Guinie, written 1561, shewing reasons for his not proceeding in a voyage then intended to the foresayd countrey. (search)
is the meeting of her doubtfull, and though we met her, yet will the men not tarry, as no reason is they should: howbeit my opinion of her is that she is put into Ireland . The Flowerdeluce was in Mil ford. Thus for that your worships might understand the whole cause why I doe not proceed, I have troubled you at this time with this my long Letter. And, as God is my Judge, not for feare of the Portugals, which there we shall meet (and yet alone without ayde) as here is a shippe which was in Lisbon , whose men say that there are in a readinesse (onely to meet us) foure great ships, of the which one is accounted 700 tunnes, & other pinnesses: yet not for feare of them, nor raging of the seas (whose rage God is above to rule) but onely for the premisses: the sequell whereof must by reason turne to a great misery to the men: the which I for my part (though it might turne me to as much gaine as the whole commeth to) yet would I not be so tormented, as the sight thereof would be a corsive t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage with three tall ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M. James Lancaster, and written from the mouth of Edmund Barker of Ipswich, his lieutenant in the sayd voyage, by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
height of Cape Blanco. The fift we passed the tropique of Cancer. The eight we were in the height of Cape Verde. All this time we went with a faire winde at Northeast, alwayes before the winde untill the 13 of the same moneth, when we came within 8 degrees of the Equinoctiall line, where we met with a contrary winde. Here we lay off and on in the sea untill the sixt of June, on which day we passed the sayd line. While we lay thus off and on, we tooke a Portugal Caravel laden by marchants of Lisbon for Brasile , in which Caravel we had some 60 tunnes of wine, 1200 jarres of oyle, about 100 jarres of olives, certaine barrels of capers, three fats of peason, with divers other necessaries fit for our voyage: which wine, oyle, olives and capers were better to us then gold. We had two men died before wee passed the line, and divers sicke, which tooke their sicknesse in those hote climates: for they be wonderful unholesome from 8 degrees of Northerly latitude unto the line, at that time of
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe relation of the notable service performed by Sir Francis Drake upon the Spanish Fleete prepared in the Road of Cadiz: and of his destroying of 100. saile of barks; Passing from thence all along the coast to Cape Sacre, where also hee tooke certaine Forts: and so to the mouth of the River of Lisbon, and thence crossing over to the Isle of Sant Michael, supprized a mighty Carack called the Sant Philip comming out of the East India, which was the first of that kinde that ever was seene in England: Performed in the yeere 1587. (search)
wo ships of Middleborough, which came from Cadiz ; by which we understood that there was great store of warlike provision at Cadiz & thereabout ready to come for Lisbon . Upon this information our Generall with al speed possible, bending himselfe thither to cut off their said forces and provisions, upon the 19. of April entered wiof Spaine. Five of them were great ships of Biskay, whereof 4. we fired, as they were taking in the Kings provision of victuals for the furnishing of his Fleet at Lisbon : the fift being a ship about 1000. tunnes in burthen, laden with Iron-spikes, nailes, yron hoopes, horse-shooes, and other like necessaries bound for the West Indur pleasure, we assailed the same castle, and three other strong holds, which we tooke some by force and some by surrender. Thence we came before the haven of Lisbon ankering nere unto Cascais , where the Marques of Santa Cruz was with his Gallies, who seeing us chase his ships a shoare, & take and cary away his barks and Cara
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse written (as is thought) by Colonel Antonie Winkfield emploied in the voiage to Spaine and Portugall, 1589. sent to his particular friend, & by him published for the better satisfaction of all such as having bene seduced by particular report, have entred into conceits tending to the discredite of the enterprise and Actors of the same. (search)
eniche ; laid along of his best Commanders in Lisbon ; and by these few adventures discovered how eardinall had made publique promise to them of Lisbon , that he would fight with us in that place, wy we lodged at Alvelana within three miles of Lisbon , where many of our souldiers drinking in two he same place, laden with men and victuals to Lisbon : the rest that escaped put into Setuvel. The Spaniards. After two nights tariance at Lisbon , the King, as you have heard, promised a suppich had somewhat, but not much, annoyed us at Lisbon , (for that our way lay along the river) attent was by them reported that we dislodged from Lisbon in disorder and feare of them (which indeed w informed: so as the Trumpet followed them to Lisbon , but could not get other answere to either ofake much care for their payment: for shal not Lisbon be thought able to make so few men rich, whenys; without the which, neither the subject of Lisbon is long able to live, nor the king able to ma[4 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage of the right honorable George Erle of Cumberland to the Azores , &c. Written by the excellent Mathematician and Enginier master Edward Wright. (search)
e made what hast we could towards them with regard alwayes to get the wind of them, and about 10 or 11 of the clocke, we came up to them with the Victory. But after some few shot & some litle fight passed betwixt us, they yeelded themselves, & the masters of them all came aboord us, shewing their several Pasports from the cities of Hamburg and Lubeck , from Breme , Pomerania and Calice. They had in them certaine bags of Pepper & Synamom, which they confessed to be the goods of a Jew in Lisbon , which should have bene caried by them into their countrey to his Factor there, and so finding it by their owne confession to be lawful Prise, the same was soone after taken and devided amongst our whole company, the value wherof was esteemed to be about 4500 pounds, at two shillings the pound. The 17 day the foresaid ships were dismissed, but 7 of their men that were willing to go along with us for sailers, we tooke to helpe us, and so held on our course for the Azores . The 1 of Aug
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A large testimony of John Huighen van Linschoten Hollander, concerning the worthy exploits atchieved by the right honourable the Earle of Cumberland, By Sir Martine Frobisher, Sir Richard Greenvile, and divers other English Captaines, about the Isles of the Acores, and upon the coasts of Spaine and Portugall, in the yeeres 1589, 1590, 1591, &c. recorded in his excellent discourse of voiages to the East and West Indies. cap. 96. 97. and 99. (search)
the English men had bene before the gates of Lisbon : whereupon the king gave us commandement thatcourse for S. Lucar, the wind drave them unto Lisbon , which (as it seemed) was willing by his forcnd damages of him, he was content to saile to Lisbon : from whence the silver was by land caried un 40 & 42 degrees, and from thence sailed to Lisbon , shunning likewise the cape S. Vincent, otherhich we staied there) to be laden and sent to Lisbon . And at the same time there put out of the Gr 5 ships which in the yere 1590 were laden in Lisbon for the Indies, 4 of them were turned againe by himselfe made, and sent to the Cardinal at Lisbon , with the names & surnames of every man, toges of 8, besides other wares. It departed from Lisbon in the moneth of November 1590. & met with thbody, whereof after that being at sea between Lisbon & the Ilands he died. The captaine wrote a f England. This English captaine comming unto Lisbon , was there wel received and not any hurt done[10 more...]
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