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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 55 55 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 3 3 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 81 BC or search for 81 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Life of Cicero. (search)
the branches of a liberal education under Diodotus the Stoic. When about twenty-five years of age, Cicero began his active career. It was customary to win one's spurs by attacking some political opponent; but this was contrary to Cicero's pacific nature, and throughout his life he prided himself on always taking the side of the defence. His first oratorical efforts have not been preserved to us. The earliest of his orations which we possess is his defence of P. Quinctius in a civil action (B.C. 81). This suit involved no political question; but no case at that time could be entirely free from politics in one form or another, and nothing is more significant of Cicero's character than the skill with which he constantly used political bias for his client's advantage without seeming to take sides. To defend Quinctius was a bold undertaking for a young advocate; for the opposing counsel was the great orator Hortensius, backed by powerful influence on behalf of the plaintiff. The case, too
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 6 (search)
pensation of 22,000 denarii (nearly $2400); any one, on the contrary, who befriended an outlaw, even his nearest relative, was liable to the severest punishment. The property of the proscribed was forfeited to the state, like the spoil of an enemy ; their children and grandchildren were excluded from a political career, and yet, so far as of senatorial rank, were bound to undertake their share of senatorial burdens." (Mommsen.) At first only the names of those who had justly forfeited their lives were proscribed ; afterwards it became easy for friends and favorites of the dictator (like Chrysogonus, attacked in this oration) to put upon the list the names of innocent men, and even of men already dead, so as to work confiscation of their property. Sulla's proscriptions nominally ceased June 1, B.C. 81. erat Romae: this shows that he had no reason to fear the proscription. frequens: § 290 (191); B. 239; G. 325, R.6; H. 443 (497); H.-B. 245. ut . . . videretur, clause of result.
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 11 (search)
cum, etc.: the proscriptions nominally ceased June 1, B.C. 81 ; the murder was committed some months after this date (see below sect. 39). jam, already (with reference to time preceding) ; nunc would refer only to the moment itself. defunctos, rid of, sc. esse. studiosissimi. devoted to the party of Sulla, and so not likely to be proscribed (see note to sect. 6. p. 3, l. 32. above). vel (emphasizing the superlative), the very , etc. propria, as his own. iste, yonder, on the accusers benches. nomine, i.e. as agent. impetum facit, makes a raid upon, implying violence, as of a charge in battle. duobus milibus nummum, i.e. about $100: § 633 (378) ; H.757 (647) ; H.-B. 675, I. They are estimated in ch ii to have been worth $300,000.