hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 8 8 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 1 AD - 99 AD or search for 1 AD - 99 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 8 document sections:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ARX (search)
of Rome after the city had expanded sufficiently to include the Quirinal and Viminal hills-that stage of the growth commonly known as the City of the Four Regions (P1. 41-44). The height of this part of the hill was about 49 metres above sea-level, and its area about one hectare. This arx, also called arx Capitolina 1 Cf. Flor. i. 13. 13: arx Capitolini montis. (Liv. vi. 20. 9; xxviii. 39. 15; Val. Max. viii. 14. 1; Tac. Hist. iii. 71), preserved its military importance down to the first century A.D. (see Aberystwyth Studies v. (1923) 33-41, for proof that Sabinus 2 Tacitus uses the following expressions: Sabinus ... arcem Capitolii insedit, usque ad primas Capitolinae arcis fores, Capitolii fores-and only subsequently Capitolium of the other summit-ending his account thus: sic Capitolium (i.e. the temple) clausis foribus indefensum atque indireptum conflagravit. held the arx, and not the temple of Jupiter), though it had no permanent garrison. In the early days sentinels were pos
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ATRIUM SUTORIUM (search)
ATRIUM SUTORIUM a building in which the ceremony of tubilustrium was annually performed. Its site is unknown, but it is natural to connect it with the shoe trade, and to place it in the Argiletum. As it is not mentioned after the first century, its site may have been occupied by the forum Transitorium (Varro, LL vi. 14; Fest. 352; CIL i 2. p. 313; Jord. i. 2. 452; FUR 30).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, BASILICA (search)
sometimes with galleries, and lighted by openings in the upper part of the side walls. The hall often ended in an apse or exedra. There were numerous variants in detail from this type, but the general effect was the same. For discussions of the basilica in general, see RE iii. 83 ff.; DS. i. 677 ff. The recent discovery of the underground basilica just outside the Porta Maggiore has somewhat modified the views previously held; Here we have a building, undoubtedly pagan, belonging to the first century after Christ, which already shows, fully developed, the plan of the Christian basilica with a nave and two aisles, separated by pillars supporting arches (Giovannoni in DAP 2. xv. 113). This basilica is not mentioned in classical literature, and was quite unexpectedly discovered in 1915. It was reached by a long subterranean passage, with two lightshafts (which has now been closed up, a new approach having been constructed from the via Praenestina), which led into a square vestibule with
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, L. CRASSUS, DOMUS (search)
L. CRASSUS, DOMUS on the Palatine, near that of Scaurus, with which it seems to have been united at a later period, for the whole property belonged to Caecina Largus in the first century A.D. This house was famous for its six columns of Hymettan marble-the first set up in any private house in Rome-and for six lotos trees that were burned in the fire of Nero when they were more than 180 years old (Plin. NH xvii. 3-6; xxxvi. 7). Because of this magnificence Crassus was called the Palatine Venus.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, OBELISCUS CAPITOLINUS (search)
OBELISCUS CAPITOLINUS the obelisk that stood in front of the church of Ara Coeli on the Capitol (BC 1888, pls. viii, ix; Heemskerck, i. II, 61; ii. 12, 16, 72, 92; cf. Hulsen's text) until some time between 1555 and 1561, when it fell. It was given in 1582 by the city authorities to Ciriaco Mattei, who set it up in the Mattei gardens, where the upper part still stands on a modern base (Mitt. 1891, 4, 27, 31, 45 ; Rodocanachi, Capitole 143, and literature cited Cf. also BC 1882, 112; Cons. 171; LS iii. 83; Boissard i, 46. ). It was erected by Rameses II at Heliopolis, and is covered with hieroglyphics (BC 1896, 270-272=Ob. Eg. 101-103). It was probably brought to Rome in the first century, and may have been set up on the Capitoline in connection with the shrine of Isis (see ISIS CAPITOLINA), which stood there at that time (Jord. ii. 183).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, OBELISCI ISEI CAMPENSIS (search)
OBELISCI ISEI CAMPENSIS several small obelisks found at different times near the church of S. Maria sopra Minerva, which were probably brought to Rome during the first century and grouped in pairs, with others, at the entrances of the temple of Isis (ISEUM, q.v.), which stood between the Saepta and the temple of Minerva: (1) that now standing above the fountain in front of the Pantheon. This belongs to the time of Rameses II and stood in front of the temple of Ra at Heliopolis. It is 6 metres high and covered with hieroglyphics (BC 1896, 260-264=Ob. Eg. 91-95). It is referred to in the fifteenth century (Poggio ap. Urlichs, p. 24) as lying in the piazza in front of S. Macuto (Arm. 317), but in the sixteenth it had already been set up there (Fulvius, Antiquit. Urbis lxxi.), and it is also marked on the map of Bufalini. It was engraved probably by Du Perac (Hulsen, Das Speculum des Lafreri in Collectanea L. S. Olschki oblata, p. 164, No. 117). In 1711 Clement XI removed it to its
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PAGUS AVENTINENSIS (search)
PAGUS AVENTINENSIS the district that comprised the Aventine hill, designated according to its original form of organisation. From the evidence of an inscription of the Augustan period, found at Lanuvium (CIL xiv. 2105), it is believed that this term continued in use down to the first century, and that the Aventine was organised religiously as a pagus until its formal inclusion in the pomerium of Claudius (Mommsen, Staatsrecht iii. 114-115 ; RE i. 774; Jord. i. I. 278; HJ 153; Merlin 58-63; DS iv. 273-276).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, STABULA IIII FACTIONUM (search)
, which is therefore correct. These stabula were in the southern part of the campus Martius, near the circus Flaminius in Region IX. They were probably near each other but quite separate, and although the others are often mentioned in literature and inscriptions (CIL vi. 10045, 10047-105, 1000055, 10057, 10059-10060, 00062, 10063, 00065, 10069, 10071-00074, 10076, 10077) that of the factio prasina is the only one that can be approximately located. This became the principal company in the first century and was favoured by the emperors, especially Caligula, who dined and slept in its stable, and constructed a magnificent stall of marble with an ivory manger for his favourite stallion Incitatus (Suet. Cal. 55; Cass. Dio lix. 14). The presence of the name in that of the church, S. Lorenzo in Prasino (HCh 284), and the discovery of inscriptions (CIL vi. 10044, 10054, 10058, 10061, 10067) prove that this stable was in the immediate neighbourhood of the Cancelleria (HJ 595). Remains of a fre