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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 54 54 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 6 6 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 200 BC or search for 200 BC in all documents.

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Agesi'mbrotus commander of the Rhodian fleet in the war between the Romans and Philip, king of Macedonia, B. C. 200-197. (Liv. 31.46, 32.16, 32.)
Alexander of ATHENS, a comic poet, the son of Aristion, whose name occurs in an inscription given in Böckh (Corp. Inscr. i. p. 765), who refers it to the 145th Olympiad. (B. C. 200.) There seems also to have been a poet of the same name who was a writer of the middle comedy, quoted by the Schol. on Homer (Hom. Il. 9.216), and Aristoph. (R(an. 864), and Athen. (iv. p. 170e. x. p. 496c.; Meineke, Fragm. Com. vol. i. p. 487.) [C.P.M
Anti'sthenes (*)Antisqe/nhs), of RHODES, a Greek historian who lived about the year B. C. 200. He took an active part in the political affairs of his country, and wrote a history of his own time, which, notwithstanding its partiality towards his native island, is spoken of in terms of high praise by Polybius. (16.14, &c.; comp. D. L. 6.19.) Plutarch (de Fluv. 22) mentions an Antisthenes who wrote a work called Meleagris, of which the third book is quoted; and Pliny (Plin. Nat. 36.12) speaks of a person of the same name, who wrote on the pyramids; but whether they are the same person as the Rhodian, or two distinct writers, or the Ephesian Antisthenes mentioned by Diogenes Laertius (6.19), cannot be decided. [L.
Apu'stius 2. L. APUSTIUS, legate of the consul P. Sulpicius in Macedonia, B. C. 200, was an active officer in the war against Philip. He was after-wards a legate of the consul L. Cornelius Scipio, B. C. 190, and was killed in the same year in an engagement in Lycia. (Liv. 31.27, 37.4, 16.)
ve meant merely to demonstrate his position, that physiology is above the human intellect, by shewing the impossibility of certainly attributing to this pantheistic essence, form, senses, or life. (Brucker, Hist. Crit. Phil. 2.2, 9; Ritter, Geschichte der Phil. 11.5, 1.) Ariston is the founder of a small school, opposed to that of Herillus, and of which Diogenes Laertius mentions Diphilus and Miltiades as members. We learn from Athenaeus (vii. p. 281), on the authority of Eratosthenes and Apollophanes, two of his pupils, that in his old age he abandoned himself to pleasure. He is said to have died of a coup de soleil. Works Diogenes (l.c.) gives a list of his works, but says, that all of them, except the Letters to Cleanthes, were attributed by Panaetius (B. C. 143) and Sosicrates (B. C. 200-128) to another Ariston, a Peripatetic of Ceos, with whom he is often confounded. Nevertheless, we find in Stobaeus (Serm. 4.110, &c.) fragments of a work of his called o(moiw/mata. [G.E.L.C]
Athena'goras 3. An officer in the service of Philip, king of Macedonia, B. C. 200. His name occurs not unfrequently in the history of the war between that prince and the Romans. (Liv. 31.27, 35, 43, 32.5, 33.7; Plb. 18.5.)
33.2, 21; Plb. 17.2, 8, 16, 18.24, 22.2, &c.) As a ruler, his conduct was marked by wisdom and justice; he was a faithful ally, a generous friend, and an affectionate husband and father. He encouraged the arts and sciences. (D. L. 4.8; Athen. 15.697; Plin. Nat. 8.74, 34.19.24, 35.49.) By his wife, Apollonias or Apollonis, he had four sons: Eumenes, who succeeded him, Attalus, Philetaerus, and Athenaeus. Attalus Ii. Surnamed PHILADELPHUS, was the second son of Attalus I., and was born in B. C. 200. (Lucian, Macrob. 12; Strab. xiii. p.624.) Before his accession to the crown, we frequently find him employed by his brother Eumenes in military operations. In B. C. 190, during the absence of Eumenes, he resisted an invasion of Seleucus, the son of Antiochus, and was afterwards present at the battle of Mount Sipylus. (Liv. 37.18, 43.) In B. C. 189, he accompanied the consul Cn. Manlius Vulso in his expedition into Galatia. (Liv. 38.12; Plb. 22.22.) In 182, he served his brother in his war
Attalus Ii. Surnamed PHILADELPHUS, was the second son of Attalus I., and was born in B. C. 200. (Lucian, Macrob. 12; Strab. xiii. p.624.) Before his accession to the crown, we frequently find him employed by his brother Eumenes in military operations. In B. C. 190, during the absence of Eumenes, he resisted an invasion of Seleucus, the son of Antiochus, and was afterwards present at the battle of Mount Sipylus. (Liv. 37.18, 43.) In B. C. 189, he accompanied the consul Cn. Manlius Vulso in his expedition into Galatia. (Liv. 38.12; Plb. 22.22.) In 182, he served his brother in his war with Pharnaces. (Plb. 25.4, 6.) In 171, with Eumenes and Athenaeus, he joined the consul P. Licinius Crassus in Greece. (Liv. 42.55, 58, 65.) He was several times sent to Rome as ambassador: in B. C. 192, to announce that Antiochus had crossed the Hellespont (Liv. 35.23); in 181, during the war between Eumenes and Pharnaces (Plb. 25.6); in 167, to congratulate the Romans on their victory over Perseus. Eum
Bae'bius 2. Q. Baebius, tribune of the plebs, B. C. 200, endeavoured to persuade the people not to engage in the war against Philip of Macedon. (Liv. 31.6.)
Baton or BATO. 1. The son of Longarus, a Dalmatian chief, who joined the Romans in their war with Philip of Macedon, B. C. 200. (Liv. 31.28.)
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