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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 75 75 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 15 15 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 216 BC or search for 216 BC in all documents.

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A'nnius 4. ANNIUS, a Campanian, who is said to have been sent as ambassador to Rome after the battle of Cannae, B. C. 216, to demand that one of the consuls should henceforth be a Campanian. (V. Max. 6.4.1; Liv. 23.6, 22.)
Ati'lius 3. L. Atilius, quaestor in B. C. 216, slain at the battle of Cannae in the same year. (Liv. 22.49.)
Ati'lius 4 M. ATILIUS and C. ATILIUS, duumviri in B. C. 216, dedicated the temple of Concord, which L. Manlius, the praetor, had vowed. (Liv. 23.22.)
Ati'lius 5. C. Atilius and M. ATILIUS, duumviri in B. C. 216, dedicated the temple of Concord, which L. Manlius, the praetor, had vowed. (Liv. 23.22.)
dians and Byzantines (B. C. 220), Attalus took part with the latter, who had done their utmost to bring about a peace between him and Achaeus (Plb. 4.49), but he was unable to render them any effective assistance. In B. C. 218, with the aid of a body of Gaulish mercenaries, he recovered several cities in Aeolis and the neighbouring districts, but was stopped in the midst of his successes by an eclipse of the sun, which so alarmed the Gauls, that they refused to proceed. (Plb. 5.77, 78.) In B. C. 216, he entered into an alliance with Antiochus the Great against Achaeus. (5.107.) In B. C. 211, he joined the alliance of the Romans and Aetolians against Philip and the Achaeans. (Liv. 26.24.) In 209, he was made praetor of the Aetolians conjointly with Pyrrhias, and in the following year joined Sulpicius with a fleet. After wintering at Aegina, in 207 he overran Peparethus, assisted in the capture of Oreus, and took Opus. While engaged in collecting tribute in the neighbourhood of this tow
dians and Byzantines (B. C. 220), Attalus took part with the latter, who had done their utmost to bring about a peace between him and Achaeus (Plb. 4.49), but he was unable to render them any effective assistance. In B. C. 218, with the aid of a body of Gaulish mercenaries, he recovered several cities in Aeolis and the neighbouring districts, but was stopped in the midst of his successes by an eclipse of the sun, which so alarmed the Gauls, that they refused to proceed. (Plb. 5.77, 78.) In B. C. 216, he entered into an alliance with Antiochus the Great against Achaeus. (5.107.) In B. C. 211, he joined the alliance of the Romans and Aetolians against Philip and the Achaeans. (Liv. 26.24.) In 209, he was made praetor of the Aetolians conjointly with Pyrrhias, and in the following year joined Sulpicius with a fleet. After wintering at Aegina, in 207 he overran Peparethus, assisted in the capture of Oreus, and took Opus. While engaged in collecting tribute in the neighbourhood of this tow
Auguri'nus 7. M. MINUCIUS (AUGURINUS), tribune of the plebs, B. C. 216, introduced the bill for the creation of the triumviri mensarii. (Liv. 23.21.)
L. Ba'ntius of Nola, served in the Roman army at the battle of Cannae, B. C. 216, in which he was dangerously wounded and fell into the hands of Hannibal. Leaving been kindly treated by Hannibal, and sent home laden with gifts, he was anxious to surrender Nola to the Carthaginians, but was gained over to the Romans by the prudent conduct of Marcellus, who had the command of Nola. (Liv. 23.15; Plut. Marc. 10, &c.)
Biba'culus 1. L. Furius Bibaculus, quaestor, fell in the battle of Cannae, B. C. 216. (Liv. 22.49.)
Blo'sius 1. F. Marius Blosius, was Campanian praetor when Capua revolted from the Romans and joined Hannibal in B. C. 216. (Liv. 23.7.)
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